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...FffftTE GOVERNMENT 

IE OF IIS ADMiiSTRATlVE ORGilNIZ&T 
VOL 2 



THE mDEP£NDENT flOENOIES 
FROM mo TO 1939 





ELSEY HURT 

BUREAU OF PUBUO flDM3N13TfiATIOH 
UNIVFRSITY OF CfllfFORNIfl 





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NOT FOR UIKCulaTIOII 


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CALIFORNIA 

STATE LIBRARY 


Accessiim No .?.?:.??A.^ . .. 

Call No. _._ 



98767 11-32 10M CALIFORNIA STATE PRINTING OFFICE 



CALIhUKKllA 

STATE 

LIBRARY 



CALIFORNIA 
STATE LIBRARY 



GOVERNMENT 
PUBLICATIONS 



Bureau of Public Administration of the University of California 

In Cooperation With the 

California State Department of Finance 



California State Government 

An Outline of Its Administrative 
Organization 

V.2 
The Independent Agencies, 1850 to 1939 



By ELSEY HURT 

Bureau oF Public Administration 
University of California 




Distributed by 

SUPERVISOR OF DOCUMENTS 

214 State Capitol, Sacramento, California 
Price 75c, Postpaid 



77467 



ZV^M 



FOREWORD 



The reference work, ' ' California State Government : An Outline of 
Its Administrative Organization from 1850 to 1936," by Elsey Hurt, 
has a sequel in the later study of the independent agencies of Cali- 
fornia state government, published here by the Bureau of Piiblic 
Administration of the University of California in cooperation with the 
California State Department of Finance. 

Compilation of the first volume was motivated by the recognized 
need for a concise, historical description of the administrative structure 
of the California state departments. The reception accorded that sur- 
vey indicated that it fulfilled the author's purpose. It is hoped that 
this second volume, containing similar information for all state adminis- 
trative agencies not included in the 1937 publication, will also be of 
value and assistance to those interested in tlie study of California state 
government. 

SAMUEL C. MAY 
Director, Bureau of Public Administration 
University of California 
Berkeley, California 
September 20, 1!)39 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



(Explanatory note: Independent Agencies included for their historical interest 
are shown in italics) 

Page 

FOREWORD iii 

INTRODUCTION 1 

GENERAL EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

GOVERNOR 1 5 

GOVERNOR'S COUNCIL 6 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 7 

REAPPORTIONMENT COMMISSION 7 

SECRETARY OF STATE 8 

Collection Agency License Division — Corporation Department — Corijorn- 
tion License Tax Department — Keeper of tlie Arcliives — Mailing and 
Distribution Doi>nrtnient — Regis ti-y Department 

STATE COMMISSION ON VOTING MACHINES 13 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 
ATTORNEY GENERAL 17 

STATE FINANCE AND TAXATION 

TREASURER 21 

CONTROLLER 22 

Administration — Accounting Division — Inheritance Tax Division — Motor 
Vehicle Fuel Tax Refund Division — Redemption Tax Division — 
Sales Tax Division — Tax Collection Division — Unemployment 
Relief Division — Warrant Division 

STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION 32 

General Administration — Alcoholic Beverage Control Division — Division 
of Assessment Standards — Motor Vehicle Transportation Tax Divi- 
sion — Motor Vehicle Fuel Tax Division — Division of Research and 
Statistics — Voiiinrhxion on J^eveniie and Taxation — State Tax Com- 
mission — California Tax Commission — !Z'o» Research Bureau — 
Retail Sales Tax Division — Valuation Division 

FRANCHISE TAX COMMISSIONER 41 

Franchise Tax Division — Income Tax Division 

STATE PERSONNEL 

STATE PERSONNEL BOARD 44 

State Civil Service Commission — Department of Finance. Division of 
Personnel and Organization 
STATE EMPLOYEES' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 47 

Commission on Pensions of State Employees 

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF 

DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT 50 

Division of State Employment Agencies — Division of Unemployment Com- 
pensation — Executive Division 

STATE ADVISORY COUNCIL 53 

STATE RELIEF ADMINISTRATION 5(J 

State Unemployment Commission — U nemplMjment Relief Finanve Com- 
mittee — -Administrator's Office — Accounting Division — Division of 
Social Service and County Administration — Division of Personnel — 
Division of Planning and Research — Division (if Special Surveys and 
Studies — Division of Worli and Reemployment 

V 



WATER RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION 

Page 
RECLAMATION BOARD 76 

Board of Swamp Land Commissioners — Reclamation Fund Commis.fion- 
ers — Board of Commissioners of the Sacramento Biver Drainage 
District — Board of Drainage Commissioners — Sacramento Drainage 
District — Administration Division — Accounting Division — Assess- 
ment Division — Engineering Division 

WATER PROJECT AUTHORITY 82 

Conservation Commission- — State M'ater Problems Conference — California 
Joint Federal-State Water Resources Commissiotir — California Water 
Resources Commission 

STATE IRRIGATION HOARD 86 

CALIFORNIA DISTRICTS SECURITIES COMMISSION 88 

Irrigation District Bond Commission — California Bond Certification 
Commission — California Irrigation and Reclamation Financing 
and Refinancing Commission 

COLORADO RIVER BOARD 90 

SAN LUIS REY WATER AUTHORITY 91 

STATE SOIL CONSERVATION COMMITTEE 92 

PORTS AND HARBORS 

BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS FOR SAN FRANCISCO 

HARBOR 95 

SAN FRANCISCO HARBOR BOND FINANCE BOARD 96 

BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS FOR THE BAY OF 

SAN DIEGO 97 

PILOTS 99 

San Francisco — Humboldt — San Diego — -San Pedro and AVilmington 
PORT WARDENS 104 

BRIDGES 
CALIFORNIA TOLL BRIDGE AUTHORITY 107 

AGRICULTURE AND FARM FINANCE 

AGRICULTURAL PRORATE ADVISORY COMMISSION 111 

CALIFORNIA FARM DEBT ADJUSTMENT COMMISSION 113 

WASTE ITILIZATION COMMISSION 114 

POULTRY IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION 114 

PUBLIC UTILITY REGULATION 

RAILROAD COMMISSION 116 

Board of Transportation Commissioners — Commissioner of Transporta- 
tion — Board of Railroad Commissioners — Department of Finance 
and Accounts — Legal Department — Power Administration — Public 
Utilities Department — Reporting Department; — Secretary's Depart- 
ment — Service Department — Transportation Department 

RACING REGULATION 
CALIFORNIA HORSE RACING BOARD 129 

REGULATION OF PROFESSIONS 

STATE BAR OF CALIFORNIA 133 

State Board of Bar Examiners 

BOARD OF OSTEOPATHIC EXAMINERS 135 

STATE BOARD OF CHIROPRACTIC EXAMINERS 136 



STATE UNIVERSITY 

Page 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 139 

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS 
STATE EMERGENCY COUNCIL 145 

LEGISLATIVE ASSISTANCE 

LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL BUREAU 140 

CALIFORNIA CODE COMMISSION 151 

Commission for the Revision of the Laws — Commissioners for the Revision 
and Reform of the Law 

COMMISSION ON UNIFORM STATE LAWS 154 

Commission for the Promotion of Uniformity of Legislation in the United 
States 
CALIFORNIA COMMISSION ON INTERGOVERNMENTAL COOPERA- 
TION 155 

JUDICIAL ADMINISTRATION 

JUDICIAL COUNCIL 159 

COMMISSION ON QUALIFICATIONS (JUDICIAL) 160 

INDEX 161 



INTRODUCTION 



Early in 1937 the Bureau of Public Administration of the Univer- 
sity of California in cooperation with the State Department of Finance 
published a book entitled : California State Government, an Outline of 
Its Administrative Organization From 1850 to 1936. That publication 
described the historical development and current organization of the 
fourteen major state departments as of March 1, 1936. At that time 
it was realized that a survey of all the administrative agencies would 
be of value, but lack of funds precluded the undertaking of such an 
extensive project. A study of tlie indojiendent agencies, therefore, was 
left for some future date. 

This second volume now completes the outline. The independent 
commissions, boards, and offices not contained in the first volume are 
presented here. Also included is the Department of Employment, 
which was created after the completion of the earlier publication. All 
agencies have been described as of August 1, 1939. 

The research again has been limited to the administrative organi- 
zation of the agencies. Functions have been disregarded almost 
entirely. The outline form has been followed as before, so that the 
discussion of each unit is A'ery brief. 

The agencies have been arranged somewhat arbitrarily in a sub- 
ject classification. Tliis was a logical development from the arrange- 
ment in the first volume where the names of the departments them- 
selves established a subject list; under Finance, or Public Works, for 
example, were combined many agencies which had operated previously 
as independent boards or commissions, even though their interests were 
related. In this volume, similarly, agencies acting in the same general 
field have been grouped together, as an aid to stiidents who may wish 
to study tlie state government from a functional point of view. 

No bibliography is appended to the volume. The sources of infor- 
mation include the California statutes, the annual or biennial and 
special reports of the agencies concerned, interviews with state officials, 
and letters from state offices. Direct quotations are followed immedi- 
ately by references to the works from which they come, except in the 
case of quotations from statutes. If the agency was established by 
legislative act, the complete statutoi-y citation appears in a footnote 
at the end of the paragraph. The legal provisions regulating most of 
the agencies have been compiled into speci.nl codes at the present time; 

(1) 



2 INTRODUCTION 

but ill tliis study only the original creating act has been cited. Each 
agency was given the opportunity to correct the factual content of its 
section of the manuscript before publication. 

It is hoped that this volume -n-ill prove useful as a reference aid 
to all those interested in the historical development or the present 
organization of tlie government of California. 



GENERAL EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

Governor 

Lieutenant Governor 
Secretary of State 



GOVERNOR 



The Constitution of 1849 provided that the supreme executive 
power of this state should be vested in a chief magistrate, known as the 
Governor of the State of California. The Governor has thus been 
regarded from the beginning as the leading executive officer in the 
state government. His general powers and duties, qualifications, etc., 
are covered by article V of both the Constitutions of 1849 and 1879. 

The original text set the term of office of the Governor at two 
years, with the statement that he should be elected at the time and 
places of voting for members of the Assembly. An amendment adopted 
September 3, 1862, changed the term of office to four years. This pro- 
vision was included in the Constitution of 1879. The term begins with 
the first Monday after the first day of January subsequent to the 
election. 

Schedule 1, section 15, of the Constitution of 1849 stipulated that 
the Governor's salary should be $10,000 per annum, until the Legis- 
lature should direct otherwise. Subsequently the compensation was 
diminished and increased several times by law. For example, the 
second Legislature reduced it to $6,000 in 1851. Ten years later it was 
raised to $7,000. A section of the Political Code of 1872 kept it at 
this level. The Constitution of 1879, however, set it at $6,000; the 
Legislature being permitted to reduce but not increase this amount, 
although not while a given incumbent was in office. Finally section 19 
of article V was amended on November 3, 1908, and the salary was 
raised to a maximum of $10,000. 

Since 'the first Legislature met, literally hundreds of laws have 
been passed which affect in one way or another the powers and duties 
of the Governor. To discuss them completely would require a separate 
volume. Throughout the years the Governor has served on innumer- 
able boards, commissions, and committees; and he has been permitted 
or required to make innumerable appointments. The chief powers and 
duties, however, as listed in "Agencies of California State Govern- 
ment . . ." compiled by the Supervisor of Documents in 1934, 
are as follows: to transact all executive business with the civil and 
military officers of government ; to make appointments to vacated offices 
as required by law ; to convene the Legislature in extraordinary session ; 
to receive reports from executive officers and to transmit them, when 
necessary, to the Legislature and the public; to exercise executive 

(5) 



6 GOVERNOR 

clemency in the matters of reprieves, pardons and commutations; to 
act as commander-in-chief of the state militia ; to approve or disapprove 
all bills passed by the Legislature. The Governor is also required to 
submit to the Legislature a budget of proposed expenditures and esti- 
mated revenues for the state government. 

Serving in an advisory capacity as a clearing house of information 
in administrative matters, a council of executive officers assists the 
Governor. This body is discussed below. 

Governor's Council 

Section 359b was added to the Political Code in 1927. It 
created a Governor's Council, consisting of the Directors of 
Finance, Education, Public AVorks, Public Health, Institutions, 
Agriculture, Industrial Relations, Social Welfare, and Natural 
Resources. The Directors of Investment, Professional and Voca- 
tional Standards, Military and Veterans' Affairs, and Penology, 
were added in 1929 (ch. 372, p. 694). The council serves as a 
cabinet for the Governor, meeting monthly for the purpose of 
keeping him and the directors informed in regard to the adminis- 
tration of each department. 

Stats. 1927, ch. 105, p. 196. Approied .\pr. 12, 1927; in effect 
July 29, 1927. 



LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 



The office of Lieutenant Governor is also a constitutional one, 
being provided for in article V of the Constitutions of 1849 and 1879. 
The Lieutenant Governor is elected at the same time and places and 
in the same manner as the Governor. His term of office and qualifica- 
tions of eligibility are the same. 

The salary of the Lieutenant Governor was originally set at double 
the pay of a State Senator by the Constitution of 1849. As in the 
case of the Governor, this compensation was changed subsequently many 
times, starting in 1851 when the Legislature made it $15 a day and the 
same mileage allowed members of the General Assembly. Section 19 
of the Constitution of 1879 stated that it should be the same per diem 
as that provided by law for the Speaker of the Assembly. This was 
amended on November 3, 1908, and the salary was finally set at $4,000 
per annum. The Legislature is allowed to diminish but not increase 
this sum, although not during the term for which a given incumbent 
has been elected. 

If for any reason the office of Governor is vacated, the powers and 
duties of that office devolve upon the Lieutenant Governor. The 
latter officer is also the President of the Senate, although he casts a 
vote only in case of a tie. He has served in the past on various boards 
and commissions, including the Board of State Prison Commissioners, 
Board of Directors of the State Prison, commission to select a site for 
the California State Reformatory, Board of Trustees of the State Burial 
Grounds, commission to select a site for the Southern California Prison, 
and Washington Bicentennial Commission. He is at present a member 
of the Advisory Pardon Board, the California Toll Bridge Authority, 
and the State Lands Commission. He is chairman of the Reapportion- 
ment Commission, a body which was created by article IV, section 6, 
of the constitution as amended November 2, 1926. The Lieutenant 
Governor is also ex officio a Regent of the University of California. 
He serves at the present time, in addition, as a member of the Gov- 
ernor's Council. 



(7) 



SECRETARY OF STATE'S OFFICE 
As Organized August 1, 1939 

COLLECTION AGENCY LICENSE DIVISION 
CORPORATION DEPARTMENT 
CORPORATION LICENSE TAX DEPARTMENT 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



The office of Secretary of State was created by article V, 
section 18, of the Constitution of 1849. The original text stated that 
this officer was to be appointed by the Governor by and with the advice 
and consent of the Senate. An amendment adopted September 3, 1862 
provided that the Secretary of State should be elected at the same 
time and places and in the same manner as the Governor and Lieu- 
tenant Governor, with the same term of office. These provisions were 
repeated in the Constitution of 1879. His duties, according to these 
documents, were to keep a correct record of the official acts of the 
legislative and executive branches of the government and to perform 
such other duties as might be assigned him by law. 

In the Constitution of 1849 the salary of the Secretary of State 
was left to the Legislature, which, in 1850, set it at $7,000 a year. This 
is probably the highest point to which the salary of this officer has 
ever gone, although it see-sawed considerably in the following years. 
For example, in 1851 it was reduced to $3,500 ; by the time the Political 
Code was passed in 1872 $4,000 Avas the sum agreed upon; the Con- 
stitution of 1879 placed it at $3,000. The maximum salary now stands 
at $5,000, according to an amendment adopted November 3, 1908. 
This may be lowered by the Legislature, but not during the term of 
office for which a given officer has been elected. 

The duties of the Secretary of State have been varied in scope, 
and, in some cases, peculiar in nature in view of the present important 
functions assigned to this office. The early reports are filled with lists 
of stationery, fuel, ink, etc. purchased and doled out to the legislators ; 
with accounts of repairs to the Capitol and care of the grounds ; with 
discussions of the tons of debris cleared out of the basement to make 
room for the public archives. Certain functions expanded to the 
point where special agencies had to be established to handle them. 
Some of these have been outlined in the first volume of this publica- 
tion. They include the State Library, the Department of Motor 
Vehicles, and the Bureau of Buildings and Grounds. The Secretary 
of State was also vested with the office of State Sealer of Weights 
and Measures, but not very much was accomplished in this field until 
a Department of Weights and Measures was created in 1913. 

The Secretary of State has also served as a member of several 
bodies which do not exist at the present time. Some of these were the 
State Board of Examiners, the Board of Capitol Commissioners, the 

(9) 

2—77467 



10 SECRETARY OF STATE 

State Commission in Lunacy, the Board of Directors of the State 
Prison, and the State Board of Forestry. 

After 1900 there was a general shift in emphasis in the duties of 
the Secretary of State. Activities relating to corporations and to elec- 
tions assumed more and more importance. The former are discussed 
briefij^ below under Corporation Department. In connection with the 
latter, the work of the department increased so greatly after the passage 
of several election laws around 1911, that the biennial report for 1910- 
1912 carried a suggestion that a special Bureau of Elections be estab- 
lished in the office of the Secretary of State. This suggestion was not 
followed up, and there is at present no administrative subdivision for 
the performance of these duties. Related in interest to this part of the 
Secretary of State's work is the State Commission on Voting Machines, 
of which he is a member. This agency is described below, following a 
discussion of the subdivisions of the office. 

The designation Department of State is often used in reports in 
referring to the Secretary of State 's office, and this agency has, in fact, 
departmental organization. There are at present three subdivisions: 
the Corporation Department, the Corporation License Tax Department, 
and the Collection Agency License Division. The Keeper of the 
Archives is also attached to this department. 

Collection Agency License Division 

1927 An act to define collection agencies, and to provide for their 
regulation, bonding, supervision, and licensing was passed in 
1927. Applications were to be filed with the Secretary of State, 
and license fees were to be collected by him. A Collection 
Agency License Division was established in the Department of 
State as a result. 

Stats. 1927, ch. 485, p. 822. Approved May I4, 1927; in effect 
July 29, 1927. 

1933 An amendment passed in 1933 created the position of Superin- 
tendent of Collection Agencies in the office of the Secretary of 
State. This officer was to conduct hearings on complaints, and 
to investigate violations of the law. 

Stats. 1933, ch. 930, p. 2453. Approved June 14, 1933; in effect 
Aug. 21, 19SS. 

Corporation Department 

1904 The Corporation Department is first mentioned as a specific 
department in the 1904-1906 biennial report of the Secretary of 
State. The first law relating to corporations was passed in 1850 
(ch. 128, p. 347). This provided for the filing of articles of 
incorporation with the Secretary of State. As the population of 



SECRETARY OF STATE 11 

California grew and business developed, this duty gained in 
importance. After 1900 the work of filing, recording, and issu- 
ing certificates of incorporation increased enormously. The fees 
collected, for example, during the biennium 1904-1906 amounted 
to $384,365.10 as compared with $63,653.55 for the 1898-1900 
biennial period. 

Provision was made for a Corporation Secretary to assist 
the Secretary of State in the examination and filing of corpora- 
tion papers, by the addition of section 415a to the Political 
Code in 1909. This was changed to section 414 in 1911. Section 
414 was repealed in 1921. 

Corporation License Tax Department 

1905 A law passed in 1905 required the payment of an annual license 
fee by all corporations, both foreign and domestic, with educa- 
tional, religious, etc. corporations exempted. The tax was to be 
collected by the Secretary of State. The Corporation License 
Tax Department was, accordingly, organized in his office. 

Sfafs. 1905, ch. 386, p. 493. Approved and in effect Mar. 20, 
1905. 

1913 The law of 1905 and all later acts amending it were repealed 

in 1913. 

8tats. 1913, ch. 336, p. 680. Approved June 10, 1913; in effect 
June SO, 1914. 

1915 Another corporation license tax act was passed by the Legisla- 
ture in 1915. The duties of the Secretary of State under this 
law were similar to those specified in the earlier act. The Cor- 
poration License Tax Department was maintained continuously 
as a subdivision in spite of the break in the existence of the tax 
law between 1914 and 1915. Between 1921 and 1925 Political 
Code section 412 listed among the employees in the office of the 
Secretary of State a superintendent and cashier of the Corpora- 
tion License Tax Department. 

Stats. 1915, ch. 190, p. 422. Approved May 10, 1915; some sec- 
tions in effect Jan. 1, 1916, others 90 days after adjournment of 
the Legislature. 

1927 Almost all the provisions of the corporation license law were 

repealed in 1927. The Corporation License Tax Department 

functioned for a few years subsequently, however, mainly to 

collect fees under section 14 which was not repealed. 

Stats. 1927, ch. 221, p. 396. Approved Apr. 20, 1927; in effect 
July 29, 1927. 



12 SECRETARY OF STATE 

Corporation License Tax Exemption Board 

1917 The Corporation License Tax Exemption Board was created 
in 1917 when the corporation license law was amended. The 
board was composed of the Secretary of State, State Con- 
troller, and members of the State Board of Control. Its 
function was to pass upon the claims of corporations to 
exemptions from the annual license tax. 

Stats. 1917, ch. 215, p. 377. Approved and in effect May 
11, 1917. 

1923 Section 7 of the corporation license law, which created tlie 
Corporation License Tax Exemption Board, was repealed in 
1923. 

Stats. 1923, ch. J,!,3, p. lOS.',. Appioicd June 20, 1923. 

Keeper of the Archives 

1850 The very first act passed by the Legislature of 1850 dealt with 
the public archives, and delegated to the Secretary of State the 
duty of obtaining and preserving such of them as pertained to 
the past administration of government in California. 
Stats. 1850, ch. 1, p. ^3. Passed and in effect Jan. 5, 1850. 

1889 Occasional mention of the archives was made in the statutes from 
time to time, but the next important law concerning them was 
passed in 1889. This act reiterated that the Secretary of State 
was custodian of the archives, but provided for the appoint- 
ment of a Keeper of the Archives to assist him in this work. The 
salary of this official was set at $2,000 per year. The act also 
provided for the building of a special vault in the basement of 
the Capitol in which to store the archives. 

Stats. 1889, ch. 289, p. 1,51. Approved and in effect Mar. 25, 1889. 

1939 The State Archives Act, passed in 1939, revised somewhat the 
act of 1889, but repeated the provisions mentioned above. No 
definite salary was provided for the Keeper of the Archives in 
this act. 

Stats. 1939, ch. 823. Approved July 18, 1939; in effect Sept. 19, 
1939. 

Mailing and Distribution Department 

Janitor's Department 

188- Some time in the 1880 's the designation Janitor's Depart- 
ment was adopted by the Secretary of State to cover the 
duties relating to distribution and storage of stationery, 
ballot paper, and reports of all kinds. This title was used 
until approximately 1912. 



SECRETARY OF STATE 13 

Mailing and Distribution Department 

1912 In the 1912-1914 biennial report of the Secretary of State 
the name Mailing and Distribution Department appears in 
place of Janitor 's Department. This subdivision is not men- 
tioned in subsequent reports. 

Registry Department 

This department is first mentioned in the 1910-1912 biennial 
report of the Secretary of State. It is included in later reports until 
1926. 

Motor Vehicle Department 

This department was established in the office of the Secretary of 
State in 1905. For a complete discussion, see Department of Motor 
Vehicles (v. 1, p. 140). 

State Commission on Voting Machines 

1903 A State Commission on Voting or Ballot Machines, consisting of 
the Governor, Secretary of State, and Attorney General, was 
created in 1903. The function of the commission was to pass 
upon any machines suggested for use in California elections, 
which might be submitted to it for examination. No machines 
could be used until they had been approved by the commission. 

Stats. 1903, ch. 226, p. 262. Approved and in effect Mar. 20, 1903. 

1!)21 The act of 1903 was repealed in 1921. 

Stats. 1921, ch. 525, p. 828. Approved May 31, 1921; in effect 
July 30, 1921. 

1923 The Governor, Secretary of State, and Attorney General were 
once more constituted the State Commission on Voting Machines. 
Stats. 1923, ch. 96, p. 182. Approved May 3, 1923. 



LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Attorney General 



ATTORNEY GENERAL 



The office of Attorney General is a constitutional one. The Con- 
stitutions of 1849 and 1879 both prescribed that he should be elected 
at the same time and places and in the same manner as the Governor 
and Lieutenant Governor. The term of office was to be the same as that 
of the Governor. 

The Constitution of 1849 directed the Legislature to set the salary 
of the Attorney General. As a result, there was an extraordinary varia- 
tion in the compensation of this officer in subsequent years. It dropped 
from $7,000 in 1850 to $1,000 in 1851. By 1872, when the Political 
Code was passed, it had risen to $4,000. The Constitution of 1879 
made it $3,000, with the proviso that this might be diminished by the 
Legislature, but not during the term for which a given incumbent had 
been elected. An amendment adopted November 3, 1908, changed it 
to $5,000. Finally another amendment adopted November 6, 1934, 
added section 21 to article V, providing that the Attorney General 
should receive the same salary as that prescribed by law for an 
associate justice of the Supreme Court. Section 19 was thereupon 
amended to read $6,000. 

The duties of the Attorney General, briefly, are to attend the 
Supreme Court and prosecute or defend all cases to which the State 
of California is a party, and to institute suits in behalf of the state; 
to exercise supervisory powers over district attorneys and other enforce- 
ment officers; to assist district attorneys at times in the discharge of 
their duties; and to render opinions to state agencies and officers. 
He is, in short, the chief attorne.y and law officer of the state. His 
office is sometimes referred to as the Legal Department. 

The Attorney General serves at present as a member of several 
commissions, and has served in the past on many others. These include 
the Board of Managers of the Bureau of Criminal Identification and 
Investigation, of which he is president, the Advisory Pardon Board, 
California Districts Securities Commission, Water Project Authority, 
Commission on Qualification of Judges, Reapportionment Commission, 
State Commission on Voting Machines, State Building Plans Commis- 
sion, California School Code Commission, Arizona Boundary Commis- 
sion, a commission on oil leases of state lands dedicated to a public 
use, Water Works District Bond Commission, Irrigation Bond Com- 
mission, San Francisco State Building Commission, State Board of 
Forestry, State Commission in Lunacy, State Board of Equalization, 
Board of Military Auditors, and State Board of Examiners. 

(17) 



STATE FINANCE AND TAXATION 

Treasurer 

Controller's Department 
State Board of Equalization 
Franchise Tax Commissioner 



TREASURER 



The office of Treasurer of the State of California was created by the 
Constitution of 1849. Provision was made for the election of this 
officer at the same time and places and in the same manner as the 
Governor. The term of office was also to be the same as that of the 
Governor. These provisions were repeated in the Constitution of 1879. 

The salary of the Treasurer, according to the Constitution of 1849, 
was to be set by the Ijegislature. In consequence, legislative enact- 
ments in this regard were numerous. Compensation varied from $9,000 
in 1850 to $3,000 in 1879, when the new constitution was adopted. An 
amendment added November 3, 1908, finally set it at $5,000, with the 
provision that the Legislature might diminish it, but not during the 
term for which a given incumbent had been elected. 

The duties of the Treasurer have been more specifically limited to 
one field than have those, for example, of the Secretary of State. In 
general his duties are to receive and keep in custody the state's 
moneys and securities, to disburse the public moneys on warrants 
drawn hy the Controller, and to administer the law relating to the 
sale of state bonds and the redemption and interest payments upon 
them. Checks and warrants covering all expenditures are cleared 
through the office; in fact, it is the official bank for the State of Cali- 
fornia. During the biennial period the Treasurer receives and dis- 
burses approximately $1,000,000,000. 

The Treasurer has served, or serves at present, as a member of the 
Board of Capitol Commissioners, State Highway Finance Board, State 
Park Finance Board, San Francisco Harbor Bond Finance Board, 
State Building Finance Board, Veterans' Welfare Finance Committee, 
Unemployment Relief Finance Committee, and the Water Project 
Authority. The present incumbent is also a member of the State 
Mining Board. 

The Treasury Department is not organized into specific adminis- 
trative subdivisions. Inasmuch as the Treasurer's duties are more or 
less unified in character, his office operates as a whole in carrying 
them out. It is, however, divided into several accounting departments. 
These functional subdivisions include the Receiving Department, the 
Bond Deposit Department, the Vault Department, and the Warrant 
Department. 



(21) 



CONTROLLER'S DEPARTMENT 
As Organized August 1, 1939 

ADMINISTRATION 

ACCOUNTING DIVISION 

INHERITANCE TAX DIVISION 

MOTOR VEHICLE FUEL TAX REFUND DIVISION 

REDEMPTION TAX DIVISION 

TAX COLLECTION DIVISION 

UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF DIVISION 

1. Auditing Section 

2. Disbiirsing Section 

3. Investigating Section 

4. Paymaster's Section 

WARRANT DIVISION 



CONTROLLER'S DEPARTMENT 



The Controller 's Department has functioned as a vital part of the 
California state government from the very beginning. The office of 
Controller (or Comptroller, as it was spelled at that time) was created 
by the Constitution of 1849, article V. It was provided that he should 
be elected at the same time and in the same manner as the Governor, 
for the same term of office. The Constitution of 1879 set his compen- 
.sation at $5,000 per annum, with the provision that this salary might 
be diminished by the Legislature, but not during the term for which a 
given incumbent had been elected. 

The first law concerning the duties of the Controller was passed 
in 1850 (ch. 4, p. 47; passed and in effect Jan. 19, 1850). These 
included such activities as making annual financial reports, keeping 
accounts of the state's dealings, settling claims, drawing warrants. 
Another duty was "to suggest plans for the improvement and manage- 
ment of the public revenues" (Pol. Code, section 433) ; and many of 
the early reports, in consequence, contain valuable descriptions of the 
state administration, with suggestions for the creation, abolition, or 
modification of certain agencies. 

The law of 1850 was amended many times subsequently. These 
amendments and additional laws expanded the activities centered in 
this department, until now it is an agency with a high degree of organi- 
zation. The varied duties assigned to the Controller are carried on by 
a general office designated Administration, in which are grouped the 
Controller, Deputy Controllers, and general office staff; and six sub- 
divisions. Of these subdivisions the Inheritance Tax Department was 
created by law. The others were set up by administrative action, but 
usually as the result of specific laws. 

Administration 

Under the designation Administration are grouped the Controller, 
Deputy Controllers, and the general office staff. Specialized activities 
are administered by separate divisions, described below. 

Accounting Division 

The Accounting Division was set up as a separate unit on July 1, 
1933. 

(23) 



24 controller's department 

Inheritance Tax Division 

The Inheritance Tax Department was the first subdivision set up 
in the office of the Controller. It is the only one specifically created 
by law. 

Inheritance Tax Deputy 

1909 The first inheritance tax law in California was passed in 
1893 (ch. 168, p. 193). This tax did not become an import- 
ant source of revenue until 1905, however, when a new act 
with broader provisions was passed. In 1909 this act was 
amended to provide for the appointment by the Controller 
of an Inheritance Tax Deputy to assist in the administra- 
tion and collection of the tax. In 1911 the Controller was 
authorized to appoint Inheritance Tax Appraisers in each 
county (ch. 395, p. 713). In his 1910-1912 biennial report 
the Controller referred to this subdivision of his department 
as the Inheritance Tax Department. 

Stats. 1909, ch. 537, p. 557. Approved and in effect .\far. 
20, 1909. 

Inheritance Tax Department 

1913 In 1913 the Legislature created the Inheritance Tax Depart- 
ment under the authority and direction of the Controller. 
The function of the new department was to supervise and 
assist in the administration of the inheritance or transfer 
tax laws of the state. Although it is still named Inheritance 
Tax Department in the law, it is ordinarily designated 
Inheritance Tax Division. 

Stats. 1913, ch. 59Ji, p. 1063. Approved June 16, 1913; 
in effect Aug. 10, 1913. 

1939 In 1939 the Legislature added to the duties of this division. 
It passed the Gift Tax Act of 1939; and provided that it 
should be administered by the State Controller in connection 
with and as a part of the Inheritance Tax Division. 

stats. 1939, ch. 652. Approved and in effect June 21, 1939. 

Motor Vehicle Fuel Tax Refund Division 

This division, originally designated Gasoline Tax Department, was 
established in 1923. Its function should be distiuguislied from that of 
the Tax Collection Division, which collects, among other taxes, the 
motor vehicle fuel taxes and the motor transportation license taxes. 

Gasoline Tax Department 

1923 An act, generally known as the Gasoline Tax Act, was 
passed in 1923. It imposed a tax of two cents on every 



controller's department 25 

gallon of motor vehicle fuel sold for use on the public high- 
ways of California. The tax was to be collected by the 
Controller and deposited in a "motor vehicle fuel fund." 
Half of the money was to be returned to the counties for 
road-building purposes, and half was to be used by the state 
in the maintenance of highways. The law was amended 
several times subsequently; the tax was raised to three 
cents, and the ratio of distribution to local governments was 
changed. A Gasoline Tax Department was established in 
the Controller's Department to perform the duties pre- 
scribed in section 11 of the act, relating to the refund of 
the tax to certain exempted consumers of gasoline. 

Stats. 192S, ch. 267, p. 511. Approved May SO, 1923; in 
effect Sept. 30, 1923. 

Motor Vehicle Fuel Tax Refund Division 

1929 Section 439 of the Political Code was amended in 1929. The 
Controller was authorized to appoint a superintendent of the 
Motor Vehicle Fuel Tax Department. Exactly when this 
designation was adopted in place of the earlier Gasoline Tax 
Department is not known. In the 1930-1932 and subse- 
quent reports of tlie Controller, however, this unit is called 
the Motor Vehicle Fuel Tax Refund Division. 

Stats. 1929, oh. 511, p. 886. Approved May 27, 1929; in 

effect Aug. 1.',, 1929. 

Redemption Tax Division 

Delinquent Tax Department 

1895 Before 1895 the Political Code provided for the sale of tax 
delinquent land at public auction by the Tax Collector. If 
no buyer appeared who would take the land and pay the 
costs due, it was then struck off to the state. In 1895 an 
act was passed which changed these provisions. Under the 
new law all delinquent property was immediately struck off 
to the state. Heavy penalties were attached to its redemp- 
tion, and the redemption period was extended from one year 
to five years. New duties were imposed upon the Con- 
troller's Department by the working of this law. 

Stats. 1895, ch. 11, p. 18. Approved and in effect Feb. 25, 
1895. 

1912 The subdivision organized to handle sales or redemptions 
of tax delinquent land was referred to in the 1912-1914 
biennial report of the Controller as the Delinquent Tax 
Department, and in the 1914-1916 report as the Delinquent 
Tax Land Department. 

3—77467 



26 CONTROLLKR's DEPARTXrEXT 

Redemption Tax Division 

1918 In the 1918-1920 biennial report this division was called the 
Redemption Department, and thereafter the Redemption 
Tax Department or Redemption Tax Division. 

1937 Tlie existence of this division was recognized by legislative 
act in 1937, when a Political Code section was amended to 
read as follows: "Out of any money in the tax deeded land 
rental fund, there is hereby appropriated to the State Con- 
troller to be expended by him such sums as may be necessary 
for the support of the Redemption Tax Department, Con- 
troller's office . . ." 

Stats. 1037, ch. 763, p. 2180. Approved and in effect June 
29, 1931. 

Sales Tax Division 

The Sales Tax Division operated in the Controller's Department 
for only four years. It was abolished in 1937. 

1933 The California Retail Sales Tax Act was passed in 1933. 
Section 25 provided that the Controller whs to keep a record 
of all assessments made by the State Board of Equalization 
under the act. The Sales Tax Division was set up in his 
department as a result. 

Stats. 1933, ch. 1020, p. 2399. Approved and in effect J ithj 
31, 1933. 

1937 A 1937 amendment to the sales tax act transferred to the 
State Board of Equalization all property, records, and 
employees relating to the record of assessments maintained 
bj'' the Controller pursuant to section 25. This division in 
the Controller's office was, accordinglj'', abolished. 

stats. 1937, ch. 778, p. 2222. Approved and in effect July 
1, 1937. 

Tax Collection Division 

The Tax Collectiun Division has a complicated history. It is 
possible to segregate the lines of its development into three units, how- 
ever; and this has been done, even though the interrelations among 
the subdivisions at times make it artificial to distinguish sharply 
between them. These units have been designated Franchise Tax Divi- 
sion, Tax Collection Division, and Motor Transportation License Tax 
Division. 

Besides certain other duties, the Tax Collection Division at the 
present time collects insurance company taxes based on gross premiums 
written in California, petrok'uni and gas charges based on productioii 



controller's department 27 

of oil and gas in California, motor vehicle fnel taxes based on sale 
of motor vehicle fuel sold in California, alcohol beverage control taxes 
based on sale of Avine and beer in California, and transportation taxes 
based on gross receipts received by transportation companies from the 
operation of trucks for hir-o on public highways of the state. 

Franchise Tax Division 

Corporation Tax Collection Department 

1911 A constitutional amendment passed in November, 1910, 
revised the whole revenue system of the state. Prior to 
that time revenues had been derived mainly from gen- 
eral property taxes, a source which was shared by both 
state and local governments. The effect of the amend- 
ment, however, was to separate state from local taxation. 
The right to levy a tax on corporations was reserved to 
the state, and this tax became its greatest source of 
income. In 1911 the Legislature passed an act to carry 
into effect the provisions of the amendment. To the 
Controller was allocated the duty of collecting the taxes, 
and, as a result, the Corporation Tax Collection Depart- 
ment was organized in his department. 

fitats. 191}, ch. SS'), J). r,:iO. Approved and in rff<;t Apr. 
1, 1911. 

Franchise Tax Division 

1920 By 1920 this division seems to have been called Fran- 
chise Tax Department, and later Franchise Tax Divi- 
sion. 

1929 When the Bank and Corporation Franchise Tax Act 
was passed in 1929, most of the duties carried on by 
the Franchise Tax Division of the Controller's Depart- 
ment were transferred to the Franchise Tax Commis- 
sioner. The Franchise Tax Division was maintained in 
existence, however, to perform certain functions 
assigned to the Cov.trolier under the terms of the act. 
The division was finally abolished in 1937. For a more 
complete discussion, see Franchise Tax Commissioner — 
Franchise Tax Division (p. 41). 

Motor Transportation License Tax Division 
Franchise Tax Division 

1923 The first motor vehicle license tax act was passed in 
1923. The motor bus and truck taxes, as they were 



28 controller's department 

commonly knowii, were handled by a section within the 
Franchise Tax Division. For the complete history of 
the legislation relating to these taxes, see State Board 
of Equalization — Motor Vehicle Transportation Tax 
Division (p. 36). 

Motor Transportation License Tax Division 

1938 In 1983 the current Motor Vehicle Transportation 
License Tax Act was passed. A new division was 
created in the Controller's Department in June of that 
year to handle collections on assessments levied by the 
State Board of Equalization. 

1937 The act was amended in 1937, providing for a self- 
assessed tax reported monthly on forms filed with the 
State Board of Equalization. Remittance covering the 
assessment was to accompany the report, which payment 
was then to be transmitted to the Controller. After 
the amendment was passed, the Motor Transportation 
License Tax Division was abolished as a separate unit, 
and the duties remaining to the Controller were placed 
in the Tax Collection Division. 

Tax Collection Division 

1929 After the collection of taxes from corporations subject to 
the Bank and Corporation Franchise Tax Act was turned 
over to the Franchise Tax Commissioner in 1929, the Con- 
troller continued to collect the taxes levied by the State 
Board of Equalization against public service corporations 
and insurance companies. This was done by the Tax Col- 
lection Division. In 1934 the operatiye propertj' of public 
service corporations was returned to the various counties of 
the state for taxation purposes. Insurance company taxes 
.still remained under the jurisdiction of the Tax Collection 
Division, however, as well as a variety of other taxes added 
at different times. The complete list of taxes collected bj^ 
this division is given in the introductory paragraph above. 

Unemployment Relief Division 

This division discharges important functions in connection with 
the expenditure of relief funds in the state. There have been two 
distinct phases in its development. After it entered the second phase 
in 1936, its operations expanded greatly and subdivisions, now four 
in number, were created to handle them. 



controller's department 29 

Disbursing Division, S.R.A. 

3933 Unemployment relief necessitated the organization of a new 
division in the Controller's Department. From January, 
1933, to June, 1936, the Disbursing Division, S.R.A., existed 
to handle the Federal Emergency Relief Fund. After this 
temporary or emergency period, however, a change was 
made in the administration of relief expenditures and the 
division in the Controller's Department was organized on a 
more permanent basis. 

Unemployment Relief Division 

1936 With the withdrawal of federal funds at the advent of the 
Works Progress Administration, the State of California 
undertook to finance direct relief completely through appro- 
priations by the Legislature. Therefore, effective July 1, 
1 936, a more permanent Unemployment Relief Division was 
established in the Controller's Department to handle his 
functions in this field. Since that time, the increasing 
volume of work resulting from these activities has resulted 
in the establishment of four subdivisions in this division. 

1. AUDITING SECTION. 

This section audits all relief budgets and preaudits all 
direct relief claims. It has offices in San Francisco and 
Los Angeles operating in close contact with the Accounting 
Division of the State Relief Administration. An addi- 
tional auditing staff in Sacramento audits all SRA adminis- 
trative payroll, travel, and purchase claims. 

2. DISBURSING SECTION. 

This section writes all direct relief warrants. Its San 
Francisco and Los Angeles offices are so organized and 
coordinated that predetermined and regular pay dates are 
met each mouth on a very extensive schedule. A disbursing 
staff also cooperates v.ith the regular Controller's Dis- 
bursing Division in Sacramento in the issuance of state war- 
rants in payment of SRA administrative, travel, and pur- 
chase claims. 

3. INVESTIGATING SECTION. 

This section, working closely with the field staff of the 
SRA, investigates all reports of overpayment, sets up 
accounts receivable representing the obligations of ineligible 
relief recipients to reimburse the state, arranges for reim- 



30 controller's department 

bursement on an installment basis if necessary, and main- 
tains a continuous contact with all defaulters until full 
restitution has been made. 

4. PAYMASTP^R'S SECTION. 

This section controls the distribution of all direct relief 
warrants, either throujih the method of spot pay or by mail. 
It is the opinion of the Controller's Department that spot 
paying has created a contact with SRA relief clients that 
has not only been the means of eliminating emploj-ed per- 
sons from the relief rolls, but has also resulted in increased 
efficiency of the SRA field staff. 

Warrant Division 

This division, as a separate unit in the Controller's Department, 
has developed only in the last few years. A change in the method of 
issuing warrants was made in 1933, and this, together with the increase 
in state business, has caused the production of warrants to jump from 
approximately 30,000 to 1,250,000 annually. The division is admin- 
istered by a Deputy Controller. 

Warrant Registrar 

1908 The position of "Warrant Registrar was probably established 
about 1908. The first reference to it is in the 1908-1910 
report of the Controller. It was abolished in 1925, the 
duties of the registrar being transferred at that time to a 
depvity controller. 

Warrant Division 

1933 A sum of money for the purcha.se and installation of war- 
rant equipment in the Controller's office was appropriated 
in 1933. The equipment was necessary in order to make 
it possible for him to prepare individual warrants for all 
claims against the state. Previously, large departmental 
warrants had been drawn in favor of boards, departments, 
and other agencies, and deposited in banks, from which 
funds were disbursed by each agency through checks or 
drafts. A later act passed the same year (ch. 605, p. 1547) 
provided for a method of registering and paying warrants 
by the Controller. 

Stats. 1933, ch. 13, p. S8. Approved and in effect Feh. 
3, 1933. 



STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION 
As Organized August 1, 1939 

CxENERAL ADIMTNISTRATION 

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL DIVISION 

DIVISION OF ASSESSMENT STANDARDS 

MOTOR VEHICLE TRANSPORTATION TAX DIVISION 

MOTOR VEHICLE FUEL TAX DIVISION 

DIVISION OF RESEARCH AND STATISTICS 

RETAIL SALES TAX DIVISION 

VALUATION DIVISION 



STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION 



The State Board of Equalization plays an important role in the 
state government as the agency responsible for the general adminis- 
tration of tax laws. It was created originally, in 1870, to equalize assess 
ments in the various counties, and to investigate methods of assessment 
and collection. Since that time, however, the whole structure of our 
tax system has been changed, and the functions of the board have been 
modified accordingly. It is now charged with the assessing or col- 
lecting of certain specific taxes, and with various other duties such as 
liquor control. To carry on these functions, the board has established 
administrative divisions from time to time. The historical development 
of the board is outlined below, followed by a description of each of 
the subdivisions. 

1870 A State Board of Equalization was created in 1870. It was 
to consist of the Controller and two members appointed by 
the Governor for a term of four years. The appointed mem- 
bers might be removed by the Governor at any time. They 
were to receive an annual salary of $3,000. The Political 
Code of 1872 provided that the membership should consist 
of the Controller, serving ex officio, and two members 
appointed by and holding office at the pleasure of the Gov- 
ernor. The salaries of the appointed members were set at 
$3,600 a year, and of the ex officio member at $1,200. 

Stats. 1869-1870, ch. 489, p. 71^. Approved Apr. //, 1870; 
in effect July 1, 1870. 

1876 The code sections relating to the State Board of Equaliza- 
tion were amended in 1876. It was now provided that the 
board should be composed of the Governor, Controller, and 
Attorney General. The salary provision was repealed. 

Code amendments 1875-1876, ch. 577, p. 11. Approved and 
ill effect Apr. 1, 1876. 

1879 In January, 1874, the Supreme Court declared Section 3696 
of the Political Code to be unconstitutional. It held that 
the power to change the valuation set by the County Assessor 
could not be delegated to the State Board of Equalization 
because article XI, section 13 of the constitution specifically 
stated that such valuation must be made by locally elected 
assessors. The board's greatest power was removed by this 

(33) 



34 STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION 

decision, and it Avas for a while an agency of little import- 
ance. 

The Constitution of 1879, however, provided for a new 
Equalization Board, consisting of one member elected from 
each congressional district of the state, with a term of office 
of four years, and the Controller. An amendment adopted 
November 4, 1884, gave the Legislature power to redistrict 
the state into four districts, and to provide for the elections 
of members of the board. 

Const. 1879, article XIII, sec. 9. 

1880 The Code amendments of 1880 repeated the constitutional 
provisions. In 1911 an amendment (ch. 748, p. 1458) 
specified that one member should be elected from each of 
the equalization districts instead of the congressional dis- 
tricts of the state. The salary of the elected members was 
set at $3,000. This was raised to $4,000 in 1909 (eh. 246, 
p. 372), and to $5,000 in 1937 (ch. 928, p. 2555). 

Code amendments 1880, ch. ^0, p. S.'i. Approved and in effect 
Apr. S, 1880. 

General Administration 

The general administrative functions of the State Board of Equali- 
zation are under the supervision of the Executive Secretary. lie coordi- 
nates and supervises administrative and legal activities, including such 
functions as public relations, employment of personnel, accounting, and 
office management. 

Alcoholic Beverage Control Division 

The State Board of Equalization is authorized by the constitution 
to license the manufacture, importation, and sale of intoxicating liquors 
in California. This power is given to it by section 22 of article XX, 
as amended on November 6, 1934. Various liquor control and excise 
tax acts, in addition, have been passed bj- the Legislature, defining the 
duties of the board in this field. 

Beverage Tax Division 

1933 An act to levy an excise tax and to regulate the manufac- 
ture, distribution, and sale of beverages containing not less 
than one-half of one per cent and not more than three and 
two-tenths per cent of alcohol, was passed in 1933. The 
State Board of Equalization was required to issue licenses 
and to assess the tax, which was to be collected by the Con- 



STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION 35 

troUer. The Beverage Tax Division was set up to administer 
the act. 

f^tati. 1933, ch. 178, p. 625. Approved and in effect Apr. 
27, 1933. 

1935 The Beverage Tax Act was repealed in 1935 by the Alcoholic 
Beverage Control Act. See discussion below. 

Alcoholic Beverage Control Division 

1933 The "State Liquor Control Act" was passed in 1933. Its 
purpose was to control, license, and regulate the manufac- 
ture, transportation, sale, purchase, and disposition of wine, 
beer, and intoxicating liquor. It did not levy an excise tax, 
as did the Beverage Tax Act passed earlier the same year; 
but it specified what types of licenses should be issued and 
what fees should be charged for them. The State Board 
of E(|nalizatioii was directed to administer and enforce the 
law, and was authorized to appoint additional employees to 
carry out the provisions. The Alcoholic Beverage Control 
Division was established for this purpose. 

Stats. 1933, ch. 658, p. 1697. Approved June 3, 1933; in 
effect when it should hecome lawful under the V. S. Con- 
stitution to manufacture intoxicating liquors. 

1935 The beverage tax and liquor control acts were repealed in 
1935 by the Alcoholic Beverage Control Act. This act com- 
bined and clarified the earlier laws. The administration of 
the act remained in the hands of the State Board of Equali- 
zation, and the collection of the new excise tax on sales of 
distilled spirits was handled by this body. The preparation 
of the assessment rolls for the collection of excise taxes on 
the sale of beer and wine was also made a duty of the board. 
The State Controller was charged with the collection of taxes 
upon these assessment rolls. The Alcoholic BcA^erage Con- 
trol Division continued to function, and added to its duties 
those of the Beverage Tax Division. 

Stats. 1933, ch. 330, p. 1123. Approved and in effect June 
13, 1935. 

Division of Assessment Standards 

A Division of Assessment Standards was created by the State 
Board of Equalization on August 1, 1938. The functions of the Adviser 
to Assessors and the work of inter-county equalization, formerly handled 
by the Valuation Division, were transferred to the new division. 



36 STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION 

Motor Vehicle Transportation Tax Division 

lf)23 In 1923 the first act imposing a tax on gross receipts from opera- 
tion of motor vehicles was passed. This law required all 
operators (with certain exceptions) of motor vehicles used to 
transport persons or property for hire, to pay a license fee of 
four per cent on their gross receipts. Licenses were to be issued 
and the tax assessed by the State Board of Equalization. Col- 
lections were to be made by the Controller. In 1925 this law 
was replaced by an act (ch. 412, p. 833) with very similar pro- 
visions; and in 1927 the act of 1925 was itself repealed (ch. 
843, p. 1708). A new division, designated Motor Transportation 
Tax Division, was set up by the board to admini.ster the func- 
tions assigned to it by these acts. 

f^tats. 1923. ch. SJ,1, p. lOG. Approved June IS, 1923; in effect 
Jan. 1, 1921,. 

1927 In the meantime, in 1926, a constitutional amendment relating 
to this subject was passed. Section 15 was added to article XIII 
on November 2, 1926. It provided for a tax on gross receipts 
of companies operating motor vehicles as common carriers for 
compensation between fixed termini over a regular route. An 
act passed in 1927 carried into effect the provisions of tliis 
amendment. As in the previous acts, the State Board of 
Equalization assessed the tax, and the Controller collected it. 
Stats. 1927, ch. 19, p. 17. Approved and in effect Mar. 5, 192,7. 

1933 The constitution was again amended in 1933, and the section 
conrerning motor vehicle carriers was eliminated. In the same 
year the ]\[otor Vehicle Transportation License Tax Act, which 
is still in operation, was passed. The license tax was set this 
time at three per cent of the gross receipts of all niotor vehicles 
used to transport persons or property for compensation or hire 
over the public highways of the state. It was provided once 
more tiiat the State Board of Equalization should euforr-e the 
provisions of the act; and this body was authorized to appoint 
accountants, auditors, investigators, and other employees neces- 
sary to administer the law. 

For the relationship of the Controller's Department to the 
State Board of Equalization in connection with this tax, see 
Tar Collection Division (p. 26). 

Stats. 19S3, ch. 339, p. 928. Approved and in effect May IS, 19SS. 

Motor Vehicle Fuel Tax Division 

1923 The Gasoline Tax Act (or Motor Vehicle Fuel License Tax Act, 
as it is now called) was passed in 1923. It has been amended 



STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION 37 

every biennium since then, but the administrative arrangements 

are in essence unchanged. The law imposed a tax of two cents 

(now three cents) on every gallon of motor vehicle fuel sold 

for use on the public highways of California. Licenses are issued 

to distributors, and the tax due from each one is computed, 

by the State Board of Equalization; the tax is collected by the 

Controller. The Motor Vehicle Fuel Tax Division administers 

the board's functions under the act. It is also charged with the 

administration of the Use Fuel Tax Act of 1937 (ch. 352, p. 763). 

Stats. 1923, ch. 267, p. 571. Approved May 30, 1923; in effect 
Sept. 30, 1923. 

Division of Research and Statistics 

Several times in the past a need for an extended survey of the 
tax system of California has been felt by those in authority in the 
state government. To satisfy this need there have been created at 
intervals certain committees or commissions, whose existence has been 
of brief duration. Altliough these bodies did not lead directly to the 
creation of the Division of Research and Statistics in the State Board 
of Equalization, they are discussed here because of the similarity of 
their purpose and function, and because they did point the way to 
the work carried on by tlie division. Strictly legislative committees 
have not been included. 

Commission on Revenue and Taxation 

]9()5 The Legislature created, in 1905, a commission whose pur- 
pose was the revision and reform of the system of revenue 
and taxation in force in California. The commission was 
to consist of a joint committee of the Senate and Assembly, 
and an expert in taxation and finance appointed by the 
Governor. The Governor also was to serve on the com- 
mittee ex officio, and was to act as chairman. 

Stnt.i. 1905, ch. 331,, p. 390. Appioied and in effect Mar. 20, 
1905. 

1909 In 1909 the membership of the commission was reduced to 
two persons appointed by the Governor, and the Governor 
himself, who remained ex officio chairman. The result of 
the studies and recommendations of the Commission on 
Revenue and Taxation was a complete change in the whole 
tax system of California, brought about by the passage of 
a constitutional amendment in November, 1910. The com- 
mission did not function after 1910. 

Stats. 1909, ch. lfl,6, p. 779. Approved and in effect Mar. 
25, 1909. 



38 STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION 

State Tax Commission 

1915 In 1915 an act was passed which authorized the Governor 
to appoint experts or other assistants to investigate the 
system of revenue and taxation in use in California and 
other states. A report containing findings and recommenda- 
tions was to be made to the Legislature in January, 1917. 
The commission appointed by the Governor in consequence 
of this act has always been referred to as the State Tax 
Commission. 

stats. 1915, ch. 19.',, p. J/32. Approved May 10, 1915; in 
effect Aug. 8, 1915. 

California Tax Commission 

1927 The California Tax Commission was created in 1927. The 
act creating it is very similar to the previous ones estab- 
lishing investigative commissions. The Governor was to 
appoint experts to study systems of revenue and taxation 
in this and other states. A report was to be rendered to 
the Legislature in 1929. After the final report was sub- 
mitted in 1929, a Joint liCgislative Committee on Taxation 
was created to analyze the recommendations and to submit 
a further report in 1931. 

stats. 1927, ch. J,.-,5, p. 781. Approved May 12, 1927; in 
. effect July 29, 1927. 

Tax Research Bureau 

1931 Suggestions for the creation of a permanent research agency 
in the field of taxation came from various sources within 
a year or so after the final report of the California Tax 
Commission. In September, 1930, the County Assessor's 
Association of California passed a resolution recommending 
the establishment of such an agency to collect facts relat- 
ing to local taxation laws and local assessment procedure; 
the State Board of Equalization, in its biennial report for 
1929-1930, seconded the recommendation; the Governor 
spoke for a permanent, non-political, fact-finding bureau to 
study tax problems, in his inaugural address on January 6, 
1931 ; and the Joint Legislative Committee on Taxation, 
mentioned above, recommended in its report of January 
23, 1931, that a research department be created within the 
State Board of Equalization. As a result of these sugges- 
tions, a Tax Research Bureau was established in 1931 in 
the office of the State Board of Equalization, under the joint 



STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION 39 

supervision of tlio Governor, Director of Finance, and 
members of the board. 

Statu. 1931, fill. 623, p. J3/fS. .'{ppiopcd June 5, J9.U; in 
effect Aug. IJ,, 1931. 

1933 The act creating the Tax Research Bureau was repealed in 
1933. 

Stats. 1933, ch. 9.5//, p. 21,82. Approved June 15, 1933; in 
effect Aug. 21, 1933. 

Division of Research and Statistics 

1938 After the abolition of the Tax Research Bureau, some tax 
investigative work was continued by a member of the staff 
of the State Board of Equalization, who served with the 
title of Research Consultant. On August 1, 1938, a Divi- 
sion of Research and Statistics was established to carry on 
this work, and to provide permanent machinery for coordi- 
nating the statistical data compiled by the other divisions 
of the board. Members of the staff of this division also 
handle the assessment of insurance taxes on the basis of 
information furnished by the Insurance Commissioner. 
This work is done under the direct supervision of the 
Executive Secretary. 

Retail Sales Tax Division 

The operations of the Retail Sales Tax Division constitute the 
largest single activity of the State Board of Equalization. The divi- 
sion was established in 1933. 

1933 The California Retail Sales Tax Act was passed in 1933. 
The State Board of Equalization was charged with the 
enforcement of the act, and was empowered to appoint such 
accountants, auditors, investigators, and assistants as were 
necessary to administer it. A new division, designated 
Retail Sales Tax Division, was, accordingly, established by 
the board. The administration of the Use Tax Act of 1935 
(ch. 361, p. 1297) was assigned to this division two years 
later. 

Stats. 1933, ch. 1020, p. 2599-. Approved and in effect 
July 31, 1933. 

1937 Under the terms of the act of 1933, the State Controller 
was assigned certain duties. In particular, section 25 pro- 
vided that he should keep a record of all assessments made 
by the State Board of Equalization under the act. The 
Sales Tax Division was set up in his department as a result. 



40 STATE BOARD OF EQUALIZATION 

A 1937 amendment to the act, however, transferred to the 
board all property, records, and employees relating to the 
record of assessments maintained by the Controller pur- 
suant to section 25. The division in the Controller's office 
was, in consequence, abolished; and new functions were 
assumed by the Retail Sales Tax Division of the State 
Board of Equalization. 

, Stafs. 1937, ch. 77S, p. 22^2. Approrrd and in effect Jiilu 

1, 1937. 

Valuation Division 

1933 A constitutional amendment affecting section 14 of article XIII 
.was adopted by the people on June 27, 1933. Under this amend- 
ment the State Board of Equalization was required to assess 
public utility property annuallj^ at its actual value. The Legis- 
lature then passed a law defining the powers of the board under 
the amendment, and authorized the appointment of such a.ssist- 
ants as were necessary to carry out the provisions of the act. 
A Valuation Division, therefore, was established by the board in 
November, 1933. 

.^tats. 1933. ch. lOJ/S, p. 2687. Approved Aug. 22, 1933; in 
effect Oct. 25, 1933. 



FRANCHISE TAX COMMISSIONER 



The Bank and Corporation Franchise Tax Act was passed in 1929 
(ch. 13, p. 19; approved and in effect Mar. 1, 1929). It changed com- 
pletely the method of taxing banks and corporations. The position of 
Franchise Tax Commissioner was created to administer the act, and 
to him was given the anthority to make all rnles and regulations neces- 
sary to carry out its provisions. The Director of Finance, the Con- 
troller, and the chairman of the State Board of Equalization were to 
appoint the Franchise Tax Commissioner and to prescribe his term of 
office and his compensation. 

The work of the Franchise Tax Commissioner's office is not segre- 
gated into specific administrative divisions; although functional units, 
as accounting and statistical departments, are recognized. For auditing 
and mailing purposes, the designations "Income Tax Division" and 
"Franchise Tax Division" are used. Despite the fact that these terms 
do not indicate distinct administrative divisions, they are employed 
here as a convenient form of segregating certain laws relating to the 
duties of the commissioner. 

Franchise Tax Division 

1929 The audit of franchise tax returns and field offices for the 
franchise tax are maintained separately from those of the 
personal income tax. The functions performed by these 
offices are prescribed by the act of 1929. 

1937 Under the terms of the act, as passed in 1929, certain duties 
were also assigned to the Controller's Department. These 
duties were transferred to the Franchise Tax Commissioner 
in 1937, thus enlarging the activities of the Franchise 
Tax Division. Section 31 gave to the Franchise Tax Com- 
missioner, instead of to the Controller as formerly, the duty 
of collecting delinquent taxes assessed under the act. Sec- 
tion 33 authorized the commissioner to issue certificates of 
revivor to suspended corporations, and provided that records, 
equipment, etc. of the Controller for use in performing the 
duties pursuant to this section should be transferred to the 
commissioner. 

Stats. 1937, ch. 8.S6, p. 232.',. Approved July 1, 1937; in 

effect Aug. 27, 1937. 

(41) 

4 — 77467 



42 FRANCHISE TAX COMMISSIONER 

19.'}7 In 1937, also, the Corporation Income Tax Act was added 
to supplement the franchise tax act. The new law imposed 
a tax on the net income of corporations which is derived 
from California and is not included in the measure of the 
franchise tax. In 1939 (ch. 1049) this tax was extended to 
apply also to associations and Massachusetts or business 
trusts, and the special tax on the latter, established in 1933, 
was repealed. The Franchise Tax Division is in charge of 
the audits and investigations under the Corporation Income 
Tax Act. 

IStats. 1937, ch. 765, p. 2184. Approved July I, t9,}7 : in 
effect Aug. 27, 19S7. 

Income Tax Division 

1935 "The Personal Income Tax Act of 1935" added to the duties 
of the Franchise Tax Commissioner that of collecting the taxes 
levied on incomes. As in the case of the franchise tax, the 
audit of personal income tax returns and field offices for the 
income tax are maintained separately from those of the franchise 
tax. The designation Income Tax Division is used to indicate 
this. 

Stats. 1935, ch. 329, p. 1090. Approred and in rffcct June /.{, 
1935. 



STATE PERSONNEL 

State Personnel Board 

State Employees' Retirement System 



STATE PERSONNEL BOARD 



A civil service system for the State of California was established 
in 1913. The administration of the system was entrusted first to a 
State Civil Service Commission, then to various other agencies, until 
a State Personnel Board was created by constitutional amendment in 
1934. The board functions without administrative subdivisions, 
although, for accounting purposes, functional divisions are designated 
Board, Administration, Testing and Recruiting, and Classification and 
Certification. 

state Civil Service Commission 

1913 A law passed in 1913 established a State Civil Service Cora- 
mission of three members, to be appointed by the Governor 
for a term of four years. Any commissioner might be 
removed by concurrent resolution of the Senate and 
Assembly, adopted by a two-thirds vote of each house. A 
salary of $3,000 per annum was provided for each com- 
missioner. The provisions relating to appointment, removal, 
and term of office of commissioners wei'e unchanged by later 
amendments to the law, until 1934. 

l^tats. WIS, c/i. 590, p. lOio. Approved June 16, J913; in 
effect Aug. 10, 1913. 

1921 The Civil Service Commission was reorganized in 1921. 
One member was designated as executive member and ex 
officio president, and upon him devolved tTie principal 
administrative functions of the commission. The two others 
were designated as associate members, and served with the 
executive member only in enacting rules, classifying and 
exempting places of employment, and passing on dismissals 
from the public service. Salaries were changed to $4,000 
for the executive member and a limit of $500 for the 
associate members. 

stats. 1921, ch. 601, p. 1020. Approved May 31, 1921; in 
effect July 30, 1921. 

1925 The commission was again reorganized in 1925. The two 
associate members were eliminated ; provision being made 
for only one commissioner. His salary was raised to $5,000. 
Stats. 1923, ch. 236, p. S91. Approved .May 19. 192.'>. 
(44) 



STATE PERSONNEL BOARD 45 

1927 The provisions of the law passed in 1921 which related to 
the State Civil Service Commission were reenacted in 1927. 
The commission was once more established in its three- 
member form, with one executive member and two associate 
members. The salary of the executive member remained 
at $5,000 ; that of associate members was set at $10 per day 
while enjjaged in the performance of official duties, not to 
exceed $500 per year. Members were to receive traveling 
expenses also. 

Sfats. 7.927, ch. J/S, p. 15. Approved Apr. ^, 1921 ; in effect 
July 29, 1927. 

Department of Finance. Division of Personnel and Organization 

1929 In 1929 the powers and duties of the State Civil Service 
Commission were transferred to the Department of Finance, 
in which a new Division of Personnel and Organization was 
established. The position of chief of the Division of Per- 
sonnel and Organization was also created. This officer was 
to be appointed by the State Civil Service Commission with 
the approval of the Director of Finance, and was to per- 
form all the duties previously imposed upon the executive 
member of the commission. The commission itself was 
retained in the department as a quasi-legislative and quasi- 
judicial body. Compensation of members was changed (ch. 
136, p. 251) to $15 a day while performing official duties, 
and traveling expenses. 

Sfafs. 1929, ch. 293, p. 597. Approved May IJf, 1929; in 

effect Aug. H, 1929. 

State Personnel Board 

1934 An initiative measure approved by the voters in 1934 created 
the State Personnel Board to administer the state civil 
service system. The measure provided that the powers and 
duties vested in any state officer or agency under any law 
relating to the state civil service should be transferred to the 
new board, thereby abolishing the Division of Personnel 
and Organization. The board was to consist of five mem- 
bers, appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent 
of the Senate for a term of ten years. It was provided, 
however, that in the beginning the Director of Finance, 
the Legislative Counsel, and the Controller should serve as 
ex officio members with specifically designated terms of office, 
and that the Governor should appoint only two members. 
An appointed member of the board might be removed by a 
two-thirds vote of each house of the Legislature. Compensa- 



46 STATE PERSONNEL BOARD 

tion of members remained the same as that of members of 
the earlier Civil Service Commission. The board was 
authorized to appoint an executive officer who should be 
a member of the state civil service, but not a member of the 
board. 

Const. J8T9, article XXIV, added JOS.'/. Initiative measure 
passed Nov. 6, 193.',; in effect Dec. 20, 193/,. 



STATE EMPLOYEES' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 



Tlie problem of pensions for public employees is not a new one, 
but the establishment of a general retirement system for state employees 
in California is quite recent. Laws relating to the retirement of cer- 
tain county officials and of teachers were passed many years before a 
constitutional amendment adopted by the people in 1930 approved the 
policy of setting up a system for the great majority of state employees. 
The amendment itself resulted from recommendations made after a 
thorough study of the question by a special commission created in 1927. 

Commission on Pensions of State Employees 

1927 A commission to inquire into the subject of retirement pen- 
sions, allowances, and annuities for state officei's and 
employees, was created in 1927. It was to consist of the 
"commissioner of the state department of civil service, ex 
officio", and four members appointed by the Governor. No 
compensation other than expenses incurred in the discharge 
of their official duties was allowed the members. The com- 
mission was to make its report by July 1, 1928. 

Stats. 1927, ch. /,31, p. 71i. Approved May 10, 1927; in 
effect July 29, 1927. 

State Employees' Retirement System Board of Administration 

1931 After the Commission on Pensions of State Employees made 
its report and recommendations, an amendment adding sec- 
tion 22a to article IV of the constitution was prepared. 
This was adopted on November 4, 1930. It empowered the 
Legislature to provide for the payment of retirement salaries 
to state employees. 

An act to establish the retirement system was passed, 
accordingly, tlie following year. A Board of Administra- 
tion was created to manage it. The board was to consist of 
the president of the Civil Service Commission, the Director 
of Finance, three members elected from the active members 
of the retirement system, and an official of a life insurance 
company and an officer of a bank appointed by the Gov- 
ernor. Members were to serve for staggered terms of four 
years. They were to serve without compensation, but were 

(47) 



48 STATE EMPLOTEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

to be reimbursed for actual and necessary expenses incurred 

through service on the board. 

Statu. 1931, ch. too, p. 1^2. Approved June 9, 1931; in 
effect Aug. 1.',, 1931. 

1935 When the State Personnel Board was established in place 
of the Civil Service Commission to administer the state civil 
service system, it was necessary to amend the retirement 
law to change the membership of the Board of Administra- 
tion. This was done in 1935. Provision was made for a 
member of the State Personnel Board, other than the Direc- 
tor of Finance, to take the place of the president of the 
Civil Service Commission. This member of the Board of 
Adniinisti'ation was to be selected by and to serve at the 
pleasure of the State Personnel Board. 

stats. 1935, ch. 152, p. 78J. Appioved May 7, 1935; in 
effect Sept. 15, 1935. 

1938 The retirement act was amended again in 1938. Provision 
was made for the inclusion of the comptroller of the Uni- 
versity of California, or such other official as the university 
might designate, in the membership of the Board of Admin- 
istration. 

Stats. 1938, ch. 12, p. 67. Appioved Mar. 30, 1938; in 
effect June 11, 1938. 

1939 In 1939 the Legislature broadened the scope of the State 
Employees' Retirement Law by providing that it should 
cover, in addition to state employees, the employees of "such 
cities, school districts, and counties as may elect to include 
their employees pursuant to contract with the Board of 
Administration of such .system." 

Stats. 1939, ch. 95^. Approved July 2-',, 1939. 



EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF 

Department of Employment 
State Relief Administration 



DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT 

As Organized August 1, 1939 

DIVISION OF STATE EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES 
STATE ADVISORY COUNCIL 

DmSION OF UNEMI'LOY.^IEXT COMPENSATION 

1. Accounting Section 

2. Auditing Section 

3. Cashiering Section 

4. Compensation Section 

5. Hollerith Section 

6. Index and Registration Control Section 

EXECUTIVE DIVISION 

1. Appeals Bureau 

2. Personnel Section 

y. Public Relations Section 

4. Research and Statistics Section 

5. Rules and Regulations Section 



DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT 



The Department of Employment was created by the Unemploy- 
ment Reserves Act of 1935 (ch. 352, p. 1226; approved June 25, 1935, 
in effect Sept. 15, 1935). The law was passed "as a part of a National 
plan of unemployment reserves and social security, and for the pur- 
pose of assisting in the stabilization of unemployment conditions." The 
new department was, in essence, a combination of the well-established 
state function of placing workers in positions through public employ- 
ment agencies, and the new activity of administering unemployment 
insurance. 

An Unemployment Reserves Commission was also created by the 
act to administer the department. The name was changed in 1939 
(Stats. 1939, ch. 1089) to California Employment Commission. The 
commission was to consist of five members appointed by the Governor 
for staggered terms of four years. In order to take care of all the 
interests involved, the law provided that two commissioners should 
represent labor ; one should represent the large employers of the state ; 
one, the independent merchants and small employers; and the fifth 
commissioner should be representative of the state and general public. 
Members were to receive traveling expenses and $10 for each day 
actually devoted to the performance of their duties, but compensa- 
tion for each one was not to exceed $1,200 per year. 

The commission was authorized to appoint an executive officer who 
should be the Director of the Department of Employment. He was 
to act also as the secretary of the commission. 

The Department of Employment is organized into two main divi- 
sions, and several service sections which may be regarded as sub- 
divisions of the Executive Division. These are discussed below. 

Division of State Employment Agencies 

This division was transferred intact from the Department of 
Industrial Relations to the new Department of Employment in 1936. 
The division does not represent a new function in the state government, 
for it had operated as a recognized unit in California for several years. 
The complete history follows. 

Bureau of Labor Statistics. State Free Employment Bureaus. 

1915 The first public employment bureau in California was estab- 
lished in San Francisco in 1868. The state entered the 



52 DEPARTMENT OP EMPLOYMENT 

picture in 1870, when the Legislature passed an act for 
the relief and support of the California Labor and Employ- 
ment Exchange, appropriating $500 a month for a period of 
two years for the venture (Stats. 1869-1870, eh. 389, p. 543). 
Nothing more was done in this field until Commissioner 
Fitzgerald of the Bureau of Labor Statistics started free 
emploj'ment offices on his own initiative on July 15, 1895, 
This Free Employment Department functioned until June, 
1897. Another long period of inaction followed. Finally, 
in 1915, a law was passed which authorized the Commis- 
sioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics to establish free 
employment bureaus in the cities of San Francisco, Los 
Angeles, Oakland, and Sacramento, and in other cities there- 
after whenever he considered it necessary. The first offices 
were opened on February 1, 1916. 

FItats. 1913, ch. S02, p. ^86. Approved May 17, 1915; in 
effect Aug. 8, 1915. 

Department of Industrial Relations. Division of State Employment 
Agencies. 

1927 When the Department of Industrial Relations was estab- 
lished in 1927, the subdivision of the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics which had administered the state free employ- 
ment bureaus became a separate Division of State Employ- 
ment Agencies. 

Stats. 1927, ch. UO, p. 733. Approved May 12, 1927; in 
effect July 29, 1927. 

California Employment Service 

1935 In 1935 the State of California accepted the provisions of 
the federal act entitled: "An act to provide for the estab- 
lishment of a national employment system and for coopera- 
tion with the States in the promotion of such system, and 
for other purposes". The Division of State Employment 
Agencies of the Department of Industrial Relations was the 
agency designated to cooperate with the United States 
Employment Service in carrying out the terms of the act. 
It was provided that the division might be called "Cali- 
fornia Employment Service." 

stats. 1933, ch. 258, p. 9^3. Approved June 1, 1935; in 
effect Sept. 15, 1935. 

Department of Employment. Division of State Employment Agencies. 

1936 The act of 1935 which created the Department of Employ- 
ment provided that the Di\'ision of State Employment 
Agencies should be transferred from the Department of 



DEPARTMENT OP EMPLOYMENT 53 

Industrial Relations to the new department on July 1, 1936. 
The provisions of the law were such that the transfer was 
to make no break in the continuity of function of the 
division. 

State Advisory Council 

1935 Working in close relationship to the Division of State 
Employment Aj?encies is the State Advisory Council. Sec- 
tion 11 of the Wagner-Peyser Act provided for the organi- 
zation of "State advisory councils composed of men and 
Avomen representing employers and employees in equal num- 
bers and the public." An unoiBcial body had been 
appointed in 1934, but the first official State Advisory 
Council was appointed by the Governor on April 23, 1935. 
It was composed of sixteen members, who were to serve 
for a term of two years. 

Division of Unemployment Compensation 

This division resulted from the amalgamation of two earlier divi- 
sions which were set up when the department was created. It handles 
the unemployment reserves functions of the department. It operates 
through six subdivisions. 

Division of Unemployment Reserves 

1936 The Division of Unemployment Reserves was established in 
the Department of Employment in January, 1936. 

Division of Unemployment Compensation 

1937 In September, 1937, the Division of Unemployment Reserves 
was merged with the Division of Accounts and Statistics. 
The new division was given the designation Division of 
Unemployment Compensation. Several subdivisions were 
organized in it at this time, including the Accounting Sec- 
tion, Auditing Section, Cashiering Section, and Index and 
Registration Control Section. The Hollerith Section was 
reorganized in its present form in May, 1938, and the Com- 
pensation Section assumed its present status in October, 
1938. 

Executive Division 

In the Executive Division is concentrated the general administra- 
tion of the Department of Employment. Under it are various 
functional units which serve the department as a whole. Their adminis- 



54 DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT 

trative authority comes direct!}^ from the Executive Director of the 
Department. They may be regarded, therefore, as subdivisions of the 
Executive Division, and are so listed here. 

1. APPEALS BUREAU. 

1937 An Appeals Bureau was establislied in September, 1937, to 
settle differences in connection with claims for unemploy- 
ment benefits. 

2. PERSONNEL SECTION. 

1938 A special Personnel Officer was employed in the department 
early in 1938 to carry out the provisions of the Civil Service 
Act, to secure proper employees for the department, and 
to provide training of personnel. The Personnel Section 
was established in its present form when the department 
was reorganized on July 1, 1938. 

3. PUBLIC RELATIONS SECTION. 

1938 A Public Relations Officer functioned from the time the 
department was first organized in order to educate 
employers, employees, and the public as to their rights and 
duties under the Unemployment Reserves Act. The Public 
Relations Section was set up in the middle of 1938. 

4. RESEARCH AND STATISTICS SECTION. 

Division of Accounts and Statistics 

1936 This division was established in January, 1936. In 
September, 1937, it was consolidated with the Division 
of Unemployment Reserves to form the new Division 
of Unemployment Compensation. 

Research and Statistics Section 

1937 The Research and Statistics Section was created in 
October, 1937. It took over some of the functions 
previou.sly administered by the Division of Accounts 
and Statistics. It compiles reports for state and fed- 
eral agencies, and investigates trends of employment. 

5. RULES AND REGULATIONS SECTION. 

1938 A Rules and Regulations Officer also was appointed soon 
after the department was organized, but the Rules and 
Regulations Section was established in July, 1938. 



STATE RELIEF ADMINISTRATION 
As Organized August 1, 1939 

ADMINISTRATOR'S OFFICE 
Bureau of Community Relations 

ACCOUNTING DIVISION 

DIVISION OF SOCIAL SERVICE AND COUNTY ADMIMS 
TRATION 

1. Bureau of County Operations 

2. Bureau of Social Service 

DIVISION OF PERSONNEL 

DIVISION OF PLANXL\(i AND RESEARCH 
Bureau of Social and Administrative Audit 

DIVISION OF WORK AND REEMPLOYMENT 

1. Bureau of Commodity Distribution 

2. Bureau of Resident Projects 

3. Bureau of Self-Help 



STATE RELIEF ADMINISTRATION 



The State Relief Administration is an agency of the state govern- 
ment created originally to meet what was considered a temporary 
emergency. Inasmuch as its aim was to alleviate distress caused by 
depression conditions, it has been extremely sensitive to any changes 
in those conditions, and to the activities of other agencies established 
from time to time to accomplish the same purpose. This has resulted in 
an organization of a highly unstable or fluid character, so that it is 
difficult to make positive statements about the number and designation 
of divisions and subdivisions at any given time, or to trace accurately 
the history of their development. Nevertheless, an attempt has been 
made to treat the Administration in the same manner as other agencies 
of the government, even though the discussion can not be so complete 
or the description of subdivisions so detailed as usual. 

This is by no means a complete picture of relief activities in Cali- 
fornia. Federal agencies whose functions are inextricably bound up 
with those of the SRA are mentioned in the briefest possible way, or 
even omitted if they did not cause a real change in administrative 
organization. Local agencies are scarcely mentioned ; and the organi- 
zation of local offices of the SRA is omitted entirely. A brief descrip- 
tion of another state commission which actually had no connection with 
the State Relief Administration, the State Unemployment Commis- 
sion, is included here, however, because of its closely related interest 
in the problem of relief. 

State Unemployment Commission 

1931 By 1931 the unemployment situation in California had 
assumed serious proportions. In January of that year the 
Legislature created a State Unemployment Commission to 
investigate unemployment questions and methods of relief, 
and to make recommendations for legislation. The commis- 
sion was to consist of five members appointed by and hold- 
ing office at the pleasure of the Governor. The report of 
the commission was submitted in November, 1932; several 
of the recommendations were put into effect subsequently. 
One recommendation was for a $20,000,000 state bond issue, 
discussed further below. 

Stats. 1931, ch. Gl, p. 5^. Approved and in effect Fel. 3, 
1931. 

(57) 
5—77467 



58 STATE RELIEF ADJIINISTRATION 

State Emergency Relief Administration 

1933 The first federal relief funds were received by California 
in January, 1933. For about three months they were admin 
istered by the Department of Social AVelfare, but on Mart-li 
24, 1933, they were turned over to an Emergency Relief 
Administrator, appointed at that time as special assistant 
to the Governor. The Governor also appointed shortly after- 
wards an Emergency Relief Commission of eleven members 
to assist the Administrator in determining relief policies. 

Legislative authority for tlicse appointments was given 
in April, by the passage of the Unemployment Relief Bond 
Act of 1933. The law became effective through a con- 
stitutional amendment (article XVI, section 9) approved 
by popular vote on June 27, 1933. The law authorized 
a $20,000,000 bond issue, of which the proceeds were to be 
loaned to counties or cities for relief purposes. The admin- 
istration of the act was vested in the State Emergency 
Relief Commission in cooperation with the Emergency 
Relief Administrator. No specific provisions concerning 
membership, term of office, or method of appointment, were 
included. 

This act also created the Unemployment Relief Finance 
Committee to determine conditions and terms of the relief 
bond issues. The committee consisted of the Governor, 
State Controller, State Treasurer, Director of Finance, and 
the Emergency Relief Administrator, with the Attorney 
General as legal advisor. 

Stats. 1933, ch. 207, p. 677. Approved Apr. 29, 1933; in 
effect June 27, 1933. 

State Relief Administration 

1934 In the extra session of the Legislature in 1934 a constitu- 
tional amendment (article XVI, section 10) was proposed, 
which was ratified by the people on November 6, 1934. Tlie 
amendment provided for a $24,000,000 bond issue for unem- 
ployment relief. It created a new Relief Administrator and 
Relief Commission to expend the funds, transferring to them 
the powers and duties assigned to the State Emergency 
Relief Commission and Emergency Relief Administrator 
by the Bond Act of 1933. The Relief Administrator was to 
be appointed by and to hold office at the pleasure of the 
Governor. He was to receive such compensation as might be 
fixed by the Governor. The commission was to consist of 
the Director of Social Welfare, ex officio, and eight members 



STATE RELIEF ADMINISTRATION 59 

who were also to be appointed by and to hold office at the 
pleasure of the Governor. The administrator was to serve 
as the executive officer ; the commission was to form policies 
and give advice for the guidance of the administrator. 

An attempt was made to liquidate the Relief Adminis- 
tration in 1937. An act was passed (ch. 234, p. 530) which 
transferred the powers and duties of the SRA to the Depart- 
ment of Social Welfare. The Attorney General issued an 
opinion, however, that this law was unconstitutional and 
invalid, inasmuch as the Legislature did not have the power 
to change an office or act ratified by the people as a con- 
stitutional amendment. In order to remove this difficulty, 
the Legislature prepared a constitutional amendment, which 
was adopted by vote of the people on November 8, 1938. 
This amendment, adding section 11 to article XVI, 
empowered the Legislature "to provide for the administra- 
tion of any constitutional provisions or laws heretofore or 
hereafter enacted concerning the administration of relief, 
and . . . modify, transfer, or enlarge the powers 
vested in the Relief Administrator, the Relief Commission 
or any other State agency or officer concerned with the 
administration of relief or laws appertaining thereto." 

From the time of its establishment early in 1933 until 
May, 1934, the State Emergency Relief Administration gave 
advice and supervision to counties, but did not operate 
through local SERA offices. Only county welfare depart- 
ments and equivalent public agencies of the counties actually 
administered unemployment relief. "Beginning in May, 
1934, the Relief Administration established its own relief 
offices to administer the Emergency Work Program, and by 
the spring of 1935 these offices covered the state handling 
all unemployment relief, both in work and direct form. The 
State Relief Administration was then a fully integrated 
organization." (California. State Relief Administration. 
Review of activities . . . 1933-1935, p. 24.) 

A certain amount of administrative organization was 
set up in the State Emergency Relief Administration during 
the period when the Civil Works Administration functioned 
under its direction. The Civil Works Administration was 
created on November 8, 1933, and the California program 
was immediately organized under the SERA. It was felt, 
however, that relief and CWA activities could be adminis- 
tered separately with more efficiency, and tliis led to the 
appointment of a Civil Works Administrator on December 



60 STATE RELIEF ADMINISTRATION 

15, and the complete separation of the tAvo programs on 
January 39, 1934. The Civil Works Administration was 
suspended at the end of March, 1934, and work relief was 
continued by the State Emergency Relief Administration 
after that date. 

This brief discussion will suffice to explain Avhy the 
outline of the administrative development of most of the 
subdivisions of this agency begins with April, 1934, even 
though the State Emergency Relief Administration had been 
in existence for a whole year at that time. 

Administrator's Office 

In June, 1934, the first organization of the SERA into coordinated 
departments and divisions took place. Five Assistant Administrators, 
each in charge of a separate operating division, were appointed. These 
units included a division under the SERA Comptroller, a Work Divi- 
sion, a Special Programs Division, a Social Service Division, and a 
Field Service Division. They are discussed more fully later. 

At the same time four administrative assistants, working directly 
under the administi'ator, were appointed. Each supervised a service 
division. These consisted of a divi-sion under a Director of Office 
I\Ianagement, a Personnel Division, a Public Relations Division, and a 
Division of Research and Surveys. During 1934 there was a Com- 
plaint Division as well. Of these, the Personnel Division and the Divi- 
sion of Research and Surveys have become separate divisions of the 
SRA; their histories may be found under Division of Personnel (p. 
63), and Division of Planning and Research (p. 64), respectively. 
The history of the other sections is given below. 

1. DIRECTOR OF OFFICE MANAGEMENT. 

1934 A Director of Office Management was appointed in June, 

1934. The position was eliminated in the SRA in September, 

1935, when a similar office was established in the Works 
Progress Administration. 

2. BUREAU OF COMMUNITY RELATIONS. 

Public Relations Division 

1934 The Public Relations Division was created in 1934 
under the supervision of one of the four administrative 
assistants discussed above. It was abolished as a 
separate division in the Administrator's Office in 
September, 1935. Its function was transferred to the 
Social Service Division. 



STATE RELIEF ADMINISTRATION 61 

Division of Planning and Research 

1939 The public relations function was accorded recognition 
as an individual subdivision once more when a Bureau 
of Community Relations was created in the Division 
of Planning and Research in January, 1939. 

Bureau of Community Relations 

1939 In July, 1939, this bureau was removed from the 
Division of Planning and Research, and set up as a 
separate bureau reporting directly to the adminis- 
trator. 

Accounting Division 

In 1934 financial procedures, office records, etc., were placed in 
charge of an administrative assistant with the title of Comptroller. 
This unit of the SERA was organized into an Accounting Depart- 
ment, a Purchasing Department, and a Statistics Department. Dis- 
bursements, closely related to the functions of this division, were 
administered by a special division of the State Controller's Depart- 
ment. See Vncinployincnt Relief Division (p. 28). 

In 1935 a slight change in organization was made. The activities 
were grouped under the general designation of Accounting Division. 
Subdivisions included a Budget Control Department, Disbursing 
Department, Purchasing and Property Department, Records Depart- 
ment, and Reports and Statistics Department. 

Late in 1935 another change was made. A Northern Accounting 
Unit and a Southern Accounting Unit were established to centralize 
accounting previously performed in county and district offices. 

In April, 1936, the term Current Operations was adopted to cover 
all the subdivisions of the Accounting Division Avith the exception 
of the two direct relief accounting units. The Disbursing Depart- 
ment was abolished at that time, as the State Controller took over 
SRA disbursements. The names of some of the other subdivisions 
were changed. Since then there have been so many transfers of sub- 
divisions and so many changes in nomenclature that no attempt is 
made here to trace further the history of each unit. The present sub- 
divisions of the Accounting Division discharge functions relating to 
such subjects as fiscal budgets, purchasing, property, claims, audits, 
and administrative and direct relief accounting. 

Division of Social Service and County Administration 

The Division of Social Service and County Administration is the 
final development of several earlier divisions whose history goes back 



62 STATE RELIEF ADMINISTRATION 

to the very beginning of the State Emergency Relief Administration. 
It performs a variety of functions closely related to the work of local 
relief offices. This is discussed more fully below. 

Family Welfare Division 

1933 The Family Welfare Division was one of the few divisions 
established in the State Emergency Relief Administration 
during 1933 wliile unemployment relief was being adminis- 
tered by county welfare agencies. It was the predecessor 
of the Social Service Division. It advised county agencies 
in case work activities and the development of relief stand- 
ards. It also issued family food budgets for iise in county 
offices. 

Social Service Division 

1934 After the Civil Works Administration ceased in March, 

1934, and the SERA was reorganized, a Social Service 
Division was created in place of the Family AVelfare Divi- 
sion. It became the largest unit in the SRA, biit apparently 
was not so highly organized as certain of the other divisions. 
The work was segregated into functional, rather than 
strictly administrative, subdivisions. Part of the staff 
worked or relief standards, procedures, and budgets. 
Enrollment in the Civilian Conservation Corps was also 
handled in this division. A Training Department, neces- 
sary because of the shortage of trained case workers, 
operated from August, 1934, until early in 1396. "A 
Medical Advisor, appointed in March, 1935, maintained 
relations between the Relief Administration and county 
medical and dental associations in establishing programs 
for the more adequate care of relief clients." (California. 
State Relief Administration. Review of activities . . . 
1933-193.5, p. 57.) This work and CCC enrollment con- 
tinued after the curtailment of the SRA program in August, 

1935. In the last week of that month the Social Service 
Division took over the functions of the Transient Division, 
in an effort to close out that program. Early in the next 
year it also absorbed the Field Service Division, described 
below. 

Field Service Division 

1934 In September, 1934, the state was divided into dis- 
tricts which were assigned to SERA field directors 



STATE RELIEF ADMINISTRATION 63 

operating in the Field Service Division. The purpose 
of the division was to assist local offices to meet 
federal and state policies and standards and to solve 
problems of administration of relief activities. This 
division was continued after the work program 
stopped in 1935, but about January, 1936, it became 
part of the Social Service Division. 

Division of County Administration 

1937 The Social Service Division was reorganized on July 26, 
1937. It was renamed the Division of County Administra- 
tion. It was not organized into definite subdivisions, but 
its functions were segregated as follows : CCC Director, 
Medical Director, Social Service Interpretation, Home 
Economist. TJie field staff was also attached to this division. 

Division of Social Service and County Administration 

1939 The designation Division of Social Service and County 
Administration was adopted in 1939. In May, 1939, two 
subdivisions were organized in the division. They are 
called the Bureau of Social Service and the Bureau of 
County Operations. 

Division of Personnel 

Administrator's Office. Personnel Division. 

1934 A Personnel Division was established in the Administra- 
tor's Office when the four administrative assistants were 
appointed in June, 1934. After the WPA was created in 
1935, and the functions of the SRA were curtailed in con- 
sequence, the work of this division was greatly reduced. 
It became mainly a record office for a while, as each divi- 
sion of the State Relief Administration carried on its own 
personnel activities. Late in July, 1936, however, these 
functions were centralized once more in the Personnel Divi- 
sion in the Administrator 's Office. A further reorganization 
occurred early in 1939. 

Division of Personnel 

1939 In January, 1939, the Division of Personnel was established 
as a separate staff division outside the Administrator's 
Office. 



G4 STATE RELIEF ADJIINIRTRATION 

Division of Planning and Research 

A subdivision concerned witli statistical work and research has 
existed in the State Relief Administration from the time the first real 
organization was established in 1934 until the present. The California 
Unemployment Relief Act of 1935 contained the statement: "The Relief 
Administrator shall maintain an adequate division of research and 
statistics and keep full records of the admhiistration of relief under 
this act." The status and title of the division have been changed 
numerous times, however. The complete history is given below. 

Administrator's Office. Division of Research and Surveys. 

1934 The Division of Research and Surveys was .set up in June, 
1934, as a service division supervised by an administrative 
assistant working directly under the Administrator. "A 
director of research and .surveys prepared periodic reports 
and bulletins, advised in the planning and conduct of work 
relief projects involving research, and engaged in special 
administrative research." (California. State Relief 
Administration. Review of activities . . . 1933-1935, 
p. 55.) The division was abolished in February, lfl3f). most 
of its work being transferred to a subdivision in tlie Account- 
ing Division. 

Accounting Division. Reports and Statistics Department. 

1936 The work of the Division of Research and Surveys, the duty 
in particular of publisliing the monthly report, was assumed 
by the Reports and Statistics Department of the Account- 
ing Division in February, 1936. This subdivision performed 
a variety of functions. During 1936 it took over the duty 
of preparing the budget. In 1936, also, the chief of the 
department was assigned the work of handling the Social 
Audit. 

The Social Audit was started early in 1935 in the 
Social Service Division, for the purpose of surveying the 
activities of the social workers in the local offices. As stated 
above, this work was transferred from the Social Service 
Division to the Accounting Division in August, 1936. 

The Reports and Statistics Department was removed 
from the Accounting Division in October, 1937. It became 
the Division of Statistics and Audits. 

Administrator's Office. Division of Statistics and Audits. 

1937 On October 9, 1937, the Reports and Statistics Department 
was placed in the Administrator's Office. It was given the 



STATE RELIEF ADMINISTRATION 65 

new designation Division of Statistics and Audits. The 
duties of this subdivision related to the budget, the Social 
and Financial Audits, and to the compilation of statistical 
reports. Certain of these functions were returned to the 
Accounting Division in June, 1938, when the Statistics and 
Budget Department was established. The name of the 
Division of Statistics and Audits was changed once more. 

Administrator's Office. Administrative Studies. 

1938 When the Division of Statistics and Audits was reorganized 
on June 8, 1938, the part which remained in the Adminis- 
trator's Office was given the title Administrative Studies. 
This unit was abolished in November, 1938. 

Accounting Division. Statistics and Budget Department. 

1938 When the Division of Statistics and Audits in the Admin- 
istrator's Office was reorganized in June, 1938, the major 
part of its functions was transferred to a new subdivision 
established in the Accounting Division. This section was 
designated the Statistics and Budget Department. It 
operated until the end of the year. 

Division of Planning and Research 

1939 In January, 1939, the Statistics and Budget Department 
was removed from the Accounting Division, and set up as 
a separate division with the title Division of Planning and 
Research. The Bureau of Community Relations was 
originally a subdivision of this division, but it was estab- 
lished as a separate division in July, 1939 (see p. 60). 
At present there is only one subdivision. 

BUREAU OF SOCIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE AUDIT 

1939 The history of the Social Audit is discussed more fully 
above. When the section in the Administrator's Office 
called Administrative Studies was abolished in Novem- 
ber, 1938, work on the Social Audit stopped. A new 
subdivision to carry on this work, however, was created 
in the Division of Planning and Research on August 1, 
1939. It was designated Bureau of Social and Adminis- 
trative Audit. 

Division of Special Surveys and Studies 

This division was created in August, 1935, to survey the problems 
caused by the reduction of relief activities when the work program 



66 STATE BELIEF ADMINISTRATION 

was discontinued. Besides analyzing the organization of social welfare 
programs throughout the state, it investigated such special questions 
as transient relief and medical care for the unemployed. It went out 
of existence in July, 1936. 

Division of Work and Reemplojnnent 

A Division of Operations was created in May, 1936. The name 
was changed early in 1939 to Division of Work and Reemployment. 
Under this division are administered miscellaneous activities, most of 
which were started as separate programs in the early days of the 
State Emergency Relief Administration, and which were brought 
together in 1934 in a Division of Special Activities. At the time the 
Division of Operations was established, four subdivi.sions were set up 
in it : the Work Division, the Surplus Commodities Division, the Divi- 
sion of Self-Help Cooperatives, and the Property Department. Some- 
what later an Accounting Department and a Camps Operations 
Department were added, and the Property Department was transferred 
to the Accounting Division. At present there are three subdivisions 
in the division. Each one is discussed separately below. 

Division of Special Activities 

1934 Under the designation Division of Special Activities were 
grouped four distinct programs inaugurated at different 
times under the supervision of the SERA. The subdivisions 
included the Rural Rehabilitation Division, the Division 
of Self-IIelp Cooperative Service, the Surplus Commodity' 
Division, and the Transient Division. When the SERA 
organization was set up in 1934, these programs were placed 
under an assistant administrator in a Special Programs 
Division. The name was changed to Division of Special 
Activities early in 1935. With the curtailment of the work 
program in August, 1935, the Division of Special Activities 
was abolished. The divisions operating under it, except 
for the Rural Rehabilitation Division which had been trans- 
ferred a month earlier to a federal agency, were absorbed 
by other divisions of the SRA. 

Rural Rehabilitation Division 

1934 In April, 1934, the Federal Emergency Relief 
Administration undertook a program of rural reha- 
bilitation. Shortly afterwards a Rural Rehabilita- 
tion Division was established in the SERA. This was 
one of the subdivisions of the Division of Special 



STATE RELIEF ADMINISTRATION 67 

Activities. On July 1, 1935, it was transferred to 
the United States Resettlement Administration. 

1. BUREAU OF COMMODITY DISTRIBUTION. 

Surplus Commodity Division 

1933 This division of the SERA was created in October, 1933. 
A few months later it was placed in the Special 
Programs Division. During the first year it dis- 
tributed to the counties surplus commodities, particu- 
larly agricultural commodities, made available by the 
federal government. The actual distribution to relief 
clients was made by the county welfare departments. 
After October, 1934, the division administered this 
function directly. Its duties were increased, also, by 
the adoption of the Avork program. Commencing Janu- 
ary 1, 1935, it undertook to deliver raw materials to 
work relief production projects and to distribute the 
finished products. When the Division of Special 
Activities was abolished in 1935, the Surplus Com- 
modity Division was transferred to the Work Division. 
The name was changed to Commodity Distribution 
Division in September, 1935. 

Surplus Commodity Distribution Department 

1936 A Surplus Commodities Division was set up in the 
Division of Operations when it was created in May, 
1936. Some time later, as the nomenclature of divi- 
sions and subdivisions became more uniform, the title 
Surplus Commodity Distribution Department was 
adopted. 

Bureau of Commodity Distribution 

1939 The name Bureau of Commodity Distribution was 
adopted early in 1939. 

2. BUREAU OF RESIDENT FROJECTS. 

State Labor Camp Committee 

1931 Early in the depression period the presence of a 
migrant unemployed group received the attention of 
state authorities. The California State Unemploy- 
ment Commission suggested the appointment of a 
Si)ecial committee to study the problem. Accordingly, 
the Governor appointed the State Labor Camp Com- 



68 . STATE RELIEF ADMIXISTRATION 

mittee on November 16, 1931. The committee recom- 
mended the establishment of state labor camps for 
homeless men. 

California Labor Camp Executive Committee 

1931 On November 27, 1931, the Governor appointed the 
California Labor Camp Executive Committee to super- 
vise operation of the camps, the establishment of 
which he authorized at that time. The camps were 
actually managed by the Division of Forestry in the 
Department of Natural Resources and the Division of 
Highways in the Department of Public Works. 

These camps were closed in April, 1932. They 
were operated once more, however, in the winter of 
1932-1933 by the Division of Forestry, being dis- 
continued in May, 1933. 

Transient Division 

1934 The state labor camp program was undertaken in the 
fall of 1933 by the SERA. It was shortly afterwards 
transferred in turn to the Civil Works Service Admin- 
istration and to the CWA. On April 1, 1934, the 
administration of the program was returned to the 
State Emergency Relief Administration. 

During this period this program was aimed at care 
of the homeless residents of California. To handle 
transients, in the meantime, a Transient Service was 
established in the SERxi in September, 1933. When 
the labor camp program was returned to the SERA in 
April, 1934, the two programs were combined in the 
Transient Division of the Special Programs Division. 

1935 During the last week in Augu.st, 1935, the Transient 
Division was transferred from the Division of Special 
Activities to the Social Service Division at the request 
of the federal government. The program was liqui- 
dated as soon as possible thereafter, as no more 
transients were to be accepted for care from federal 
funds after September 20th. Whenever possible thej^ 
were to be returned to their states of residence. Home- 
less residents of California, however, were still the 
responsibility of the SRA. Transient and resident 
homeless men 's camps were both placed under the state 
director of social service. The statistical and account- 



STATE RELIEF ADMINISTRATION 69 

ing sections of the Transient Division were absorbed by 
the corresponding divisions of the SRA, and the family 
service bureaus by the Social Service Division. 

Camps Operations Department 

1936 In August, 1936, this work was transferred from the 
Social Service Division to the Division of Operations, 
and the Camps Operations Department was established. 

Bureau of Resident Projects 

1939 The name of the subdivision was changed about May, 
1939, to Bureau of Resident Projects. 

3. BUREAU OF SELF-HELP. 

Division of Self-Help Cooperative Service 

1933 This division was created in July, 1933. It worked 
with California cooperatives, carrying on such func- 
tions as transmitting applications for federal grants, 
giving advice on production problems, and supervising 
their auditing and accounting systems. It became a 
subdivision of the Special Programs Division in 1934. 
After the Division of Special Activities was eliminated 
in 1935, the Division- of Self-Help Cooperative Service 
was continued on a smaller scale as a separate sub- 
division. 

Division of Self-Help Cooperatives 

1936 When the Division of Operations was created in May, 
1936, one of the subdivisions established in it was the 
Division of Self-Help Cooperatives. 

Self- Help Department 

1937 In A])ril, 1937, tlie operating plan for this service was 
reorganized. The name was changed to Self-Help Pro- 
gram or Division of Self-Help. A little later it became 
known as the Self-Help Department. 

Bureau of Self-Help 

1939 Early in 1939 the terminology of the subdivisions in 
the Division of "Work and Reemployment was stand- 
ardized, and the designation Bureau of Self-Help was 
adopted. 



70 STATE RELIEF ADMINISTRATION 

4. WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

After the Civil Works Administration activities ceased in 
March, 1934, two divisions to administer work relief were estab- 
lished in the State Emergencj' Relief Administration. Thej^ were 
the Engineering Division and the Professional, Technical and 
Women's Work Division. These divisions continued as separate 
operating units until February, 1935, although nominally they 
were placed in a Work Division with a single director on July 
25, 1934. By 1935 the division was organized into several sub- 
divisions, called departments. These are discus.sed separately 
below. 

The Works Progress Administration, a federal agency, was 
created by the President on May 8, 1935. In the following months 
the functions of the AVork Division of the SRA were transferred 
largely to the new organization. On August 22, 1935, nearly all 
projects were suspended and the Emergency Work Program was 
terminated. Almost all the subdivisions of the Work Division were 
eliminated at this time. The few work projects remaining under 
the SRA after August were all closed by April 1, 1936. 

When the Division of Operations was created in the SRA in 
May, 1936, the Work Division became one of its subdivisions. 
It did not function as an independent unit, however, as it was 
administered by the director of the Division of Operations. It 
was really set up as a separate section in the division, with the 
name Works Department, in January or February, 1938. Con- 
struction work in camps was performed by this subdivision. It 
also assumed cosponsorship for WPA projects. 

The Works Department was finally abolished in June, 1939. 
The Bureau of Resident Projects took over the construction work 
in camps, and the function of sponsoring WPA projects was 
assumed by the Division of Work and Reemployment as a whole. 

The original Work Division of the SERA, as stated above, was 
quite highly organized. Because of its historical interest, its sub- 
divisions are discussed individually below. 

a. Construction Department. 

Engineering Department 

1934 An Engineering Division was established in the 
SERA in April, 1934. It was placed in the 
W^ork Division in July of that year, with the 
designation Engineering Department, but it 
maintained a more or less independent status 
for several months after that. 



STATE RELIEF ADMINISTRATION 71 

Construction Department 

1935 In February, 1935, the Work Division was 
reorganized. The name of this unit was changed 
to Construction Department. It was eliminated 
as a separate subdivision after the discon- 
tinuance of the work program on August 22, 
1935. 

b. Emergency Education Department. 

Professional, Technical and Women's Work Department 

1934 The Emergency Education Program was inaugu- 
rated in December, 1933, under the Civil 
Works Administration. After March, 1934, the 
supervision of this program in cooperation with 
the State Board of Education was assigned to 
the Professional, Technical and Women's Work 
Department. The program for aid to college 
students, started in California in March, 1934, 
was handled by the same division. 

Emergency Education Department 

1935 When the Work Division was reorganized in 
February, 1935, an Emergency Education 
Department was established as a separate sub- 
division. The student aid program ended in 
June, 1935 ; the other projects terminated on 
October 1, 1935, except for nursery school and 
vocational rehabilitation classes, which were con- 
tinued for a few months longer. 

c. Health, Safety and Insurance Department. 

1934 In February, 1934, the Supreme Court of California 
ruled that relief workers were not state employees, and 
therefore were not subject to the state workmen's com- 
pensation act. This problem was finally solved by 
establishing an insurance fund from federal relief 
grants, and creating a Health, Safety and Insurance 
Department to administer it. "In addition to admin- 
istering compensation benefits, the Health, Safety and 
Insurance Department exercised control over condi- 
tions on projects affecting the healtli and safety of 



STATE RELIEF ADMINISTRATION 

workers, and inspected transient camps and shelters 
and projects of the selfhelp cooperatives." (Cali- 
fornia. State Relief Administration. Review of 
activities . . . 1933-1935, p. 116.) When the Work 
Division was created at the end of July, 1934, the 
Health, Safety and Insurance Department became one 
of its subdivisions. When the work program stopped 
in August, 1935, this subdivision went to the WPA as 
an independent department. 

d. Production Department. 

1935 A Production Department was organized in the Work 
Division early in 1935. It operated closely with the 
Surplus Commodity Division, which assumed on Janu- 
ary 1, 1935, the duty of distributing all commodities 
from production projects. The Production Depart- 
ment was abolished in August, 1935. 

e. Professional and Technical Work Department. 

Professional, Technical and Women's Work Department 

1934 This division was set up in April or May, 1934, 
after the Civil Works Administration ceased 
operating. It was placed in the Work Division 
in July, 1934, although it really functioned as 
an independent division until February, 1935. 

Professional and Technical Work Department 

1935 In February, 1935, the professional and tech- 
nical activities were segregated from the 
women's work, and placed in a special subdivi- 
sion of the State Relief Administration. It was 
concerned with projects in the fields of planninjr, 
public welfare, health and recreation, arts and 
research. When the work program was termi- 
nated in August, 1935, this department went out 
of existence. 

f. TFojuen's Work Department. 

Professional, Technical and Women's Work Department 

1934 Women's work activities were included in the 
Professional, Technical and Women's Work 



STATE RELIEF ADMINISTRATION 73 

Department which was created in April or May, 
1934. 

Women's Work Department 

1935 When the Worl;; Division was reorganized in 
February, 1935, a State Director of Women's 
Work was appointed to advise all branches of 
the division. Reference was made thereafter to 
a Women 's Work Department. It was abolished 
Avhen tlie Avork program was discontinued in 
August, 1935. 



-774C7 



WATER RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION 

Reclamation Board 

Water Project Authority 

State Irrigation Board 

California Districts Securities Commission 

Colorado River Board 

San Luis Rey Water Authority 

State Soil Conservation Committee 



KECLAMATION BOARD 
As Organized August 1, 1939 



ADMINISTRATION DIVISION 
ACCOUNTING DIVISION 
ASSESSMENT DIVISION 
ENGINEERING DIVISION 



RECLAMATION BOARD 



Very early in the history of the California state government, the 
legislators displaj^ed an interest in the problem of swamp and over- 
flowed lands. Various agencies were created and abolished; certain 
districts were established over and over again ; but no coordinated plan 
of development survived for any extended period, until the Reclama- 
tion Board was established in 1911. The early agencies interested in 
drainage and flood control are described here, even though they do not 
lead in a direct evolutionary chain to the creation of the board. The 
present system of reclamation districts, organized under the provisions 
of "An act to promote drainage", passed in 1885 (ch. 158, p. 204) 
and amended many times subsequently, however, is not discussed. These 
iistricts are administered locally, and not by the Reclamation Board. 

Board of Swamp Land Commissioners 

1861 The first state agency to control reclamation in California 
was established in 1861. All unsold swamp lands had been 
granted to the state by the federal government in 1850 by 
the "Arkansas Act". The Legislature passed laws in 1855 
and 1858 to provide for the sale of these lands, but no 
administrative organization was set up to supervise recla- 
mation activities. In 1861, however, an act was passed 
which created a board of commissioners authorized to plan 
for and undertake the reclamation of swamp and overflowed 
and salt marsh and tide lands. The board was to consist 
of five members (the actual members of the first board 
being specified in the act), elected in joint session by the 
Legislature for a term of two years. Vacancies were to be 
filled by appointment by the Governor. Each member was 
to receive an annual salary of $1,200. The salary was 
reduced in 1863 (ch. 349, p. 523) to $900. The board was 
empowered to appoint an engineer to survey and draw up 
plans for the reclamation of any district in which petitions 
had been received from the o^vners of one-third of the lands ; 
and to award contracts for construction, spending up to 
$1.00 per acre on the project, providing the landowners 
subscribed for the balance of the cost. 

Sfnts. J861, ch. 3r>2. p. .W.T. Appiuicd iind in cffci-l Miiu 
13, 1861. 

(77) 



78 RECLAMATION BOARD 

1866 The Board of Swamp Land Commissioners was abolished 
in 1866. The powers and duties of the board were trans- 
ferred to the county boards of supervisors. County sur- 
veyors were to be ex officio Engineers of Reclamation. The 
act of 1861 was specifically repealed in 1868. In the latter 
j^ear an act was passed (Stats. 1867-1868, eh. 415, p. 507) 
which provided for the formation of districts and the 
election of boards of trustees to manage them. "The boards 
of county supervisors did not follow a system of flood con- 
trol or reclamation, as had the Boarti of Swamp Land Com- 
missioners, but permitted the formation of districts of all 
sizes, shapes and conditions, even with overlaps, etc., often 
including the land of one owner onlj'. Under this law the 
state parted with most of its swamp land holdings in about 
three j'ears. " (California. Reclamation Board. Biennial 
report, 4, 1918, p. 8.) 

Stats. 1805-1866, ch. 570, p. 199. Approved and in effect 
Apr. 2. 1866. 

Reclamation Fund Commissioners 

1872 An act was passed in 1872 to provide for funding the 
indebtedness of the reclamation and levee districts of the 
state. A board of three Reclamation Fund Commissioners 
w^as to be appointed by the Governor for a term of four 
years. 

Sfats. 1871-1872, ch. 570, p. 835. Approved and in effect 
Mar. 30, 1872. 

1874 In 1874 the provisions of the act of 1872 were repealed, 
except in so far as they applied to Levee District No. 5 in 
Sutter County. The powers and duties of the Reclama- 
tion Fund Commissioners were turned over to the Board 
of Supervisors of Sutter County. 

stats. 187.3-1874, ch. ^13, p. 585. Approved and in effect 
Mar. 25, 1874. 

Board of Commissioners of the Sacramento River Drainage District 

1878 In 1878 the Legislature created the Sacramento River 
Drainage District, and a board of commissioners to admin- 
ister it, for the purpose of draining the surplus waters of 
the Sacramento River and the waters flowing from the east 
side of the Coast Range Mountains into Suisun Bay. "The 
commissioners of this district reported in 1879 that the 
scheme had failed, due to lack of any large, comprehensive 
flood control scheme including all districts in the Sacra- 
mento Valley and lowlands, which should control all relief 



RECLAMATION BOARD 79 

and reclamation work, including the damaging effects of 

the mining debris problem." (California. Reclamation 

Board. Biennial report, 4, 1918, p. 9.) 

Stats. 1877-1878, ch. 6f,S, p. 987. Approved and in effect 
Apr. 1, 1878. 

Department of Engineering 

1878 In 1878, also, the position of State Engineer was created 
to investigate the problems of irrigation, drainage, and navi- 
gation of rivers. A discussion of the later development of 
this office and of the creation of other related agencies inter- 
ested in irrigation and flood control may be found under 
Department of Engineering in v. 1, p. 219. 

Board of Drainage Commissioners 

1880 A Board of Drainage Commissioners was created in 1880. 
It was to consist of the Governor, Surveyor General, and 
State Engineer, serving ex officio ; and its function was to 
divide the state into drainage districts and to organize 
them. In the July session of 1881 the Supreme Court of 
California declared this act to be unconstitutional, mainly 
because it delegated legislative powers to executive officers. 

Stal.i. 1880, ch. 117, p. 123. Approved and in effect Apr. 
23, 1880. 

Sacramento Drainage District 

1905 An act passed in 1905 created the Sacramento Drainage Dis- 
trict, a Board of Drainage Commissioners, and a Board of 
River Control. The nine drainage commissioners were to 
be elected by the land-owners of the district for a term of 
four years, and were to have charge of reclamation and 
drainage activities within the district. The Board of River 
Control was to consist of two members appointed by the 
Governor, one of them being the president of the Board of 
Drainage Commissioners, and the other a competent civil 
engineer. They were to serve for a term of four years 
with an annual salary of $6,000. 

The effectiveness of the terms of the act was to be 
contingent, however, upon the acceptance by the state and 
federal governments of certain flood control plans, with the 
necessary appropriations. This the federal government 
failed to do. The second Sacramento Drainage District, like 
the one of 1878, therefore, was a failure. 

Stata. 190.5, ch. SCH, p. .',.',3. Appinml and in effect Mar. 
20, 190.5. 



80 RECLAMATION* BOAKD 

1911 Tlie act of 1905 wliich created tlie Sacramento Drainage 
District was repealed in 1911. 

Stals. lOll, ch. 8, p. '). Approved anil in effect Feb. 3, 1911. 
Reclamation Board 

1911 In 1911 the Legislature adopted the plan of flood control 
for the Sacramento River recommended by the California 
Debris Commission in the report transmitted by the United 
States Secretary of War on June 27, 1911. A Reclama- 
tion Board of tliree members, to be appointed by and to 
hold oflfiee at the pleasure of the Governor, was created to 
carry out the provisions of the plan. This board was to 
pass upon all plans of reclamation entailing the construction 
of levees or canals along the Sacramento River or its tribu- 
taries. 

stats. Er. fe.ts. 1911, ch. 2.'i, p. 111. .\pproved Dec. 2',, 1911. 

1913 The Reclaniatioii Board Act was greatlj^ expanded in 1913. 
The membership was increased to seven members, to be 
appointed by and to hold office at the pleasure of the Gov- 
ernor. Three of the members were to be residents or land- 
owners of the portion of the San Joaquin Valley included 
within the new Sacramento and San Joaquin Drainage Dis- 
trict which was ci'eated by the act. This requirement was 
eliminated in 1915 (ch. 686, p. 1338). Each member was 
to receive necessary expenses incurred in the performance 
of official duties, and $20 for each day in attendance at 
board meetings, but his total annual salary was not to 
exceed $1,000. The powers of the board were enlarged. 

stats. 191S, ch. no, p. 2.-,2. Approved May 26, 1913; in 
effect Aiiff. 10, 1913. 

1929 In 1929 the Director of Finance was made executive officer 
of the Reclamation Board "for the purpose of reporting 
to the Governor's council upon matters relating to reclama- 
tion projects and problems. ' ' The Division of Reclamation 
Finance was thereupon organized in the Department of 
Finance, with the chief engineer and general manager of 
the board ex officio chief. The Reclamation Board itself 
remained, however, an independent administrative agency. 
It has four subdivisions. 

Stats. 1929. ch. 336, p. CTS. Approved May IS, 1929; in 
effect Alt!/. I'h 1^29. 



RECLAMATION BOARD 81 • 

Administration Division 

1913 This division was set up in 1913, when the Reclamation 
Board was organized after the amending act of that year 
was passed. 

Accounting Division 

1913 The Accounting Division also was created when the board 
was organized. 

Assessment Division 

1913 The Assessment Division was established in 1913 at the 
inception of the board. 

Engineering Division 

1912 The act which created the Reclamation Board directed the 
State Engineer to make surveys and collect necessary data 
for the completion of the California Debris Commission's 
plan. He was to report on this matter to the Reclamation 
Board by January 1, 1913. The amending act of 1913 
stated that he should advise and assist the Reclamation 
Board and be reimbursed by that body for expenses 
incurred in the pursuit of this duty. 

As the Reclamation Board itself described the organiza- 
tion in its 1918 biennial report, the Engineering Division 
(or Engineering Department, as it was called for the first 
few years) was, from 1912 through 1917, technically an 
adjunct of the State Engineering Department. Actually, 
however, it was a part of the board's organization, for the 
Flood Control Engineer, who was appointed by the State 
Engineer and assigned to reclamation activities, reported 
directly to the board, and he and his staff were paid by it. 
In 1918 the general manager of the Reclamation Board 
became also its chief engineer, and the title of Flood Con- 
trol Engineer, so far as the board was concerned, was 
abolished. 



WATER PROJECT AUTHORITY 



The problem of conserving:, regulating, and utilizing California's 
water resources to the best advantage has attracted legislative atten- 
tion at intervals throughout the last fifty or sixty years. Emphasis on 
the various aspects of the problem shifted from time to time, resulting 
in the creation of many different state agencies dealing with more or 
less related interests. The Reclamation Board, for example, followed 
one line of development ; the State Irrigation Board, another ; and the 
Division of Water Resources of the Department of Public "Works, still 
another. The history of each of these agencies has been outlined under 
its own title. 

In 1878 the office of State Engineer was created for the general 
purpose of investigating irrigation, drainage, and navigation questions. 
This is discussed more fully in v. 1, p. 219. Since that time various 
special commissions have functioned for brief periods, adding through 
their reports to the sum total of knowledge about the water situation 
in this state. During this period, also, several federal investigations 
have been undertaken, and legislative committees have concerned them- 
selves with the subject now and again. 

The Water Project Authority was created in 1933 in a final attempt 
to solve one angle of the problem. Preceding a description of this 
agency, is a discussion of the earlier state commissions whose efforts 
led directly or indirectly to the development of the Central Valley 
Project, administered by the authority. Strictly legislative commis- 
sions have been omitted. 

Conservation Commission 

1911 The Conservation Commission of the State of California was 
established in 1911. It was to consist of three persons 
appointed by and holding office at the pleasure of the 
Governor. Members were allowed no compensation, but 
were to be reimbursed for actual expenses incurred during 
the performance of official duties. The purpose of the com- 
mission was to investigate "the subjects of forestrj', water, 
the use of water, water power, electricity-, electrical or other 
power, mines and mining, mineral and other lands, dredg- 
ing, reclamation and irrigation," with a view to revising 
the laws with respect to them. The major portion of the 

( s-' ) 



WATER PROJECT AUTHORITY 83 

commission's work was devoted to the consideration of 

water resources and irrigation problems. 

The commission issued a report early in 1913. With 

respect to water resources, the commission pointed out the 

confusion surrounding the entire water rights situation in 

the state, criticized the prevailing practice of appropriation, 

and urged that the state be empowered to clarify titles to 

water and to have full control over its appropriation and 

use. 

Stats. 1911, ch. 4O8, p. 822. Approved and in effect Apr. 8, 
1911. 

1921 The Conservation Commission apparently did not function 
after 1915 or 1916. The act creating it was repealed in 
1921. 

Stats. 1921, ch. 639, p. 1072. Approved June 1, 1921; in 
effect Jithj 31, 1921. 

State Water Problems Conference 

1915 In 1915 an act was passed which empowered the Governor 
to call a special conference, which should consider and 
recommend a unified state policy with reference to irriga- 
tion, -flood control, and related subjects. The conference 
was to consist of the Lieutenant Governor, speaker of the 
Assembly, and chairman of each of the Senate and Assembly 
committees on irrigation, and on drainage, swamp, and over- 
flowed lands, the State Engineer, chairman of the State 
Water Commission, chairman of the State Reclamation 
Board, chairman of the State Conservation Commission, 
Secretary of Agriculture, and six others to be appointed by 
the Governor. The conference was to meet during 1915 
and 1916, and to go out of existence with the filing of its 
report not later than November 30, 1916. Members were 
not to receive salaries, but were to be reimbursed for neces- 
sary traveling expenses. 

As a result of this conference a report was issued con- 
taining many recommendations concerning the improve- 
ment of water law, coordination of water utilization and 
regulation, and state and federal aid for water conservation. 

Stats. 1915, ch. 3.59, p. 514. Approved May 18, 1915; in 
effect Aug. 8, 1915. 

California Joint Federal-State Water Resources Commission 

1929 The Governor was authorized in 1929 to appoint a water 
resources commission of not less than five nor more than 
seven members. The commission was required to cooperate 



84 WATER PROJECT AUTHORITY 

with a federal commission or agency designated by tlio 
President of the United States, and with any legislative 
commissions investigating flood control, conservation, or 
navigation. The commission was to file its final report by 
December 1, 1930. Members were to receive no compensa- 
tion, but were to be reimbursed for official business expenses. 

Stats. 1929, ch. 561, p. 963. Approved May 29, 1929; in 
effect Aug. 14, 1929. 

California Water Resources Commission 

1931 A Senate Concurrent Resolution in 1931 recommended the 
appointment of a commission to be known as the California 
Water Resources Commission. The commission was to con- 
sist of nine members, appointed from representative areas by 
the Governor. The fundamental purpose of the commis- 
sion was "to study and report upon the conservation, 
development and distribution of the water resources of the 
state, including particularly findings and recommendations 
as to the economic phases involved in said plan and such 
proposed legislation, resolutions and constitutional amend- 
ments as may be necessary and advisable to carry into effect 
a coordinated plan for the development and distribution of 
the water resources of the state." 

The commission was appointed on August 24, 1931, and 
made its report in June, 1932. Its recommendation con- 
cerning the creation of a permanent "Water Resources Com- 
mission by amendment to the constitution was not followed 
up, but its suggested statute relating to the Central Valley 
Project was the basis for an act pa.ssed the following year. 

stats. 1931, S. C. R. no. JfO, p. 31.'>2. Filed with Secretary 
of State May ir>, 1931. 

Water Project Authority 

1933 After consideration of the many studies made by state and 
federal agencies, legislative committees, and the special 
commissions discu.ssed above, the Legislature passed the 
Central Valley Project Act in 1933. This act created the 
Water Project Authority of the State of California, con- 
sisting of the Attorney General, State Controller, State 
Treasurer, Director of Finance, and Director of Public 
Works. In the event that any of these offices were abolished 
at some future time, provision was made for the appoint- 
ment of additional members. The Director of Public Works 
was to be the chairman of the authority; the State 
Engineer its executive officer. IMembers were to serve with- 



WATER PROJECT AUTHORITY 85 

out compensation other than necessary expenses incurred 
in travel on official business. 

The Water Project Authority was charged with the 
responsibility of constructing the Central Valley Project. 
This entailed such activities as approving general engineer- 
ing plans, acquiring water rights and rights of way, arrang- 
ing for the sale of water and electric power to be made 
available by the project, and negotiating with the United 
States government for appropriations and necessary author- 
izations for the construction of the project. 

Although originally proposed as a state undertaking, 
the Central Valley Project was authorized and adopted as 
a federal reclamation enterprise by executive order of the 
President in 1935, subsequently affirmed by congressional 
act in 1936, and reaffirmed in 1937. The project is being 
constructed, therefore, by the Bureau of Reclamation of 
the United States Department of the Interior. The tech- 
nical work of the authority has been handled by the Division 
of Water Resources of the Department of Public Works. 

stats. 19S3, ch. 10^2, p. 2643. Approved Aug. 5, 1933; in 
effect Jan. 13, 1934, after a favorable vote on referendum 
measure submitted to the people Dec. 19, 1933. 



STATE IRRIGATION BOARD 



The State Irrigation Board is one of the several bodies which have 
been established at one time or another in this state to administer 
special local districts. The first Irrigation Board was created in 1915 ; 
the present board was set up in 1921. 

Irrigation Board 

1915 The California Irrigation Act, passed in 1915, provided for 
the storage and diversion of water, the manufacture of 
electric and water power, management of water districts, 
etc. It created the Irrigation Board to administer the act. 
The board consisted of three members appointed by the 
Governor for a term of four years. Compensation of mem- 
bers was set at $10 for each day employed in tlie perform- 
ance of oflScial duties. 

This act was passed in an attempt to forward the con- 
struction of the so-called Iron Canyon Project on the Sacra- 
mento River. No action was taken under it, however, at 
that time. It was amended in 1917 and 1919. An effort 
was made to organize five small districts in Madera County, 
litigation ensued, and finally, on August 3, 1920, the 
Supreme Court declared the act to be unconstitutional 
(Mordecai vs. Board of Supervisors, 183 Cal. 434). It was 
repealed by the Water Storage District Act of 1921, and 
again by a law passed specifically for. that purpose in 1931 
(ch. 93, p. 124). 

Stats. 1915, ch. 621, p. 1173. Approved June 4, 1915; in 
effect Aug. 8, 1915. 

State Irrigation Board 

1921 The California Irrigation Act was repealed by the "Water 
Storage District Act in 1921. The new law provided for 
the organization and operation of water storage districts, 
and conferred powers upon the State Engineer to administer 
it. To assist the State Engineer in the performance of his 
duties, and to provide for the equalization of assessments 
under the act, provision was made for the appointment of 
two persons to be known as executive directors. They were 
to be appointed by the Governor for a term of four years. 

(86) 



I 



STATE IRRIGATION BOARD 87 

One was recjuired to ]iave had five years experience in 
administration. Their compensation was set at $20 for each 
day employed in tlie performance of official duties, and 
traveling expenses. 

Stats. 1921, ch. 914, P- n27. Approved June 3, 1921; in 
effect Aug. 2, 1921. 

1923 Section one of the California Water Conservation District 
Act, passed in 1923, created a board to be known as the 
State Irrigation Board, consisting of the State Engineer 
and the two executive directors of the Water Storage Dis- 
trict Act. The term of office and compensation provisions 
established by the California Water Storage District Act, 
remained the same. The board was authorized to unite irri- 
gation, water storage, reclamation, or drainage districts into 
single districts known as water conservation districts. 
Stats. 1923, ch. 426, p. 978. Approved June 18, 1923. 



CALIFOENIA DISTRICTS SECURITIES 
COMMISSION 



The California Districts Securities Commission was created iu its 
present form in 1931. Its history, however, goes back to 1911 when the 
first bond certification commission was established. The whole question 
of district bonds was thoroughly' investigated by a special commission 
which reported in 1930. These agencies are discussed more fully below. 

Irrigation District Bond Commission 

1911 The first act relating to bonds of irrigation districts which 
provided for a special certification commission was passed in 
1911 (ch. 157, p. 322), and amended in the extra session that 
same year (ch. 3, p. 3). It was revised and reenacted in 
1913. The law provided for a commission to which the 
board of directoi's of a California irrigation district might 
apply in order to have the bonds of the district certified as 
legal investments for trust funds, etc. The commission was 
to consist of the Attorney General, State Engineer, and the 
Superintendent of Banks. Although it was not so desig- 
nated in the law, tlie commission was known as the Irriga- 
tion District Bond Commission. Its function was to make 
certain investigations, upon application by a board of direc- 
tors of a district, and to report upon the findings to the 
State Controller. 

Stats. 191S, ch. 306, p. 778. Approved June IS, 1913; in 
effect Aug. 10, 1913. 

California Bond Certification Commission 

1921 An amendment to the Bond Certification Act in 1921 
specifically named the commission the California Bond Cer- 
tification Commission. 

stats. 1921, ch. 706, p. 1198. Approved June 2, 1921; in 
efect Aug. 1, 1921. 

1931 AVhen the California Districts Securities Commission was 
created in 1931, it succeeded to and was vested with all the 
duties and powers of the California Bond Certification Com- 
mission. 

( es ) 



CALIFORNIA DISTRICTS SECURITIES COMMISSION 89 

California Irrigation and Reclamation Financing and Refinancing Com- 
mission 

1929 A law passed in 1929 appropriated a sum of money to be 
used at the direction of the Governor for the purpose of 
reporting upon better methods of financing and refinancing 
irrigation, reclamation, and other public improvement dis- 
tricts. The Governor was authorized to appoint a com- 
mission to be known as the California Irrigation and Recla- 
mation Financing and Refinancing Commission. It Avas to 
consist of not less than three nor more than seven members. 
No compensation was specified, but members were to receive 
actual and necessary expenses incurred in the performance 
of their duties. The commission was to report its findings 
and conclusions by December, 1930. Certain of its recom- 
mendations were incorporated in the California Districts 
Securities Commission Act, passed by the next Legislature, 
in 19.31. 

Stats. 1929, ch. 520, p. 8.97. Approved May 27, 1929; in 
effect Aug. II,, 1929. 

California Districts Securities Commission 

1931 The California Districts Securities Commission was created 
in 1931. It was to consist of the Attorney General, State 
Engineer, Superintendent of Banks, and two other members 
to be appointed by the Governor for a term of four years. 
One of the appointed members was required to have had at 
least five years actual experience in the affairs of a Cali- 
fornia irrigation district as an officer or employee. All 
members were to receive actual expenses incurred on official 
business, and the appointed members were to receive in 
addition $10 for each day spent in the discharge of official 
duties. 

The California Districts Securities Act was a continua- 
tion of the earlier Bond Certification Act. The new com- 
mission succeeded to the powers and duties of the California 
Bond Certification Commission, but was given additional 
responsibilities in connection with the financial administra- 
tion of irrigation districts. 

Stats. 1931, ch. 1073, p. 2263. Approved June 19, 1931; in 
effect Aug. 11,, 1931. 



7—77467 



COLORADO RIVER BOARD 



The story of the Colorado River has been written many times. 
For years the wide interest in its control and development was expressed 
in surveys, reports and investigations of various governmental agencies 
and private individuals. In the 1920 's, however, more definite action 
was taken, leading up to the passage of federal legislation. California 
appointed representatives at different times during this period to work 
with special commissions on the problems of interstate relationships. 
Finally, in 1927, the Ijegislature established the Colorado River Com- 
mission of California; and, in 1937, the Colorado River Board. These 
two agencies are discussed below. 

Colorado River Commission of California 

1927 This commission was created in 1927. It was to consist of 
three members appointed by and holding office at the plea- 
sure of the Governor. The chairman of the commission was 
to be regarded as the executive ofiScer. His salary was set 
at $15 for each day engaged in the performance of official 
duties. The compensation of the other two members was 
set at $10 per da}-. The commissioners were also to receive 
traveling and other necessary expenses. 

The purpose of the Colorado River Commission was to 
confer with representatives of the United States and other 
states on the problems of the Colorado River, and to take 
any steps necessary to protect the interests of California 
and its citizens in the waters of or water rights in the river. 
It was authorized to employ such secretaries, engineers, 
attorneys, or other assistants as it needed to carry out its 
functions. 

The commission was to go out of existence on September 
1, 1929. 

Stats. 1927, ch. 596, p. 1030. Approved May 17, 1927; in 
effect July 29, 1927. 

1929 The Legislature continued the commission in existence until 
September 1, 1931, by an act passed in 1929. 

Stats. 1929, ch. S67, p. 691. .Approved May 21, 1929; in 
effect Aug. 14, 1929. 

(90) 



COLORADO RIVER BOARD 91 

Colorado River Board of California 

1937 The Colorado River Board was created in 1937. The act 
provided that a list of not less than two persons was to be 
submitted to the Governor by each of the following : the 
legislative body of the city of San Diego, and the governing 
bodies of the Palo Verde Irrigation District, the Imperial 
Irrigation District, the Coachella Valley County Water Dis- 
trict, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern Cali- 
fornia, and the Los Angeles Department of Water and 
Power. From each such list the Governor was to appoint 
one member of the board. The members were to serve with- 
out compensation other than expenses incurred in the per- 
formance of official duties. 

Annually the board was to elect one of its members 
chairman. He was to be ex officio the "Colorado River 
Commissioner", and was to serve as the executive officer. 
The board was authorized to exercise on behalf of the State 
of California all the rights and duties conferred by the 
United States law known as the "Boulder Canyon Project 
Act." The board was also to make further investigations 
concerning the uses of and claims to the waters of the 
Colorado River. 

The board was to cease functioning after four years, 

or at an earlier date if its work was finished sooner. 

Stats. 1937, ch. 838, p. 2350. Approved July 1, 1937; in 
effect Aug. 27, 1937. 



SAN LUIS REY WATER AUTHORITY 



The San Luis Rey Water Authority was created in 1939 (Stats. 
1939, ch. 420; became a law June 6, 1939, in effect Sept. 19, 1939). 
It was to consist of seven memberi appointed by the Governor for 
staggered terms of four years. One member was to represent each of 
the following districts or interests: the city of Oceanside, the Vista 
Irrigation District, the Carlsbad Mutual Water Company, and the 
Board of Supervisors of San Diego County. The other two members 
were to be owners of land riparian to the San Luis Rey River, to 
represent the riparian landowners. The expenses of members and those 
of the employees of the authority were to be paid from donations. 
The function of the authority was to survey the San Luis Rey River 
watershed and to consider water use, conflicting claims, conserva- 
tion, etc. 



STATE SOIL COXSEKVATION COMMITTEE 



Throughout the United ISlates in recent years efforts have been 
made to conserve the soil as one of the country's great natural resources. 
California followed this trend in 1938, when the Legislature passed an 
act which declared a state policy of soil conservation through the 
prevention or control of soil erosion. 

1938 The State Soil Conservation Committee was created in 1938. 
This committee was to consist of the State Engineer, the 
dean of the College of Agriculture of the University of 
California, and one member to be appointed by and to hold 
office at the pleasure of the Governor. The appointed mem- 
ber was to be a qualified civil engineer with at least three 
years experience in the study and planning or in the con- 
struction of works for the control or prevention of soil 
erosion. Members were to serve without compensation, but 
were to be reimbui'sed for expenses incurred in connection 
with the work of the committee. 

The Soil Conservation Committee was to promote the 
formation of soil con.servation districts, to investigate pro- 
posed districts, to advise and cooperate in soil conservation 
activities, and, in general, to administer the act. 

Stats. Ex. Sess. 1938, ch. 7, p. 7/8. Approved Mar. 29, 1938; 
in effect June 11, 1938. 



(92) 



PORTS AND HARBORS 

Board of State Harbor Commissioners for San Francisco Harbor 

Board of State Harbor Commissioners for the Bay of San Diego 

Pilots 

Port Wardens 



BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS 
FOR SAN FRANCISCO HARBOR 



The port of San Francisco has a long history, dating back to the 
clays of Spanish occupation of California. Its development was hap- 
hazard and under private ownership until 1863, when the first state 
agency was established to manage it. Since then the whole waterfront 
has changed greatly, commerce has increased enormously, and the 
Board of State Harbor Commissioners has expanded proportionately. 
The laws governing the activities of the board were compiled in 1937 
into a Harbors and Navigation Code. 

A brief description of a related agency, the San Francisco Harbor 
Bond Finance Board, follows the historical outline of the Board of 
State Harbor Commissioners. 

Board of State Harbor Commissioners 

1863 The Board of State Harbor Commissioners was created in 
1863. It was to consist of three commissioners, one of whom 
was to be elected by the qualified electors of the state at the 
same time and in the same manner as members of the 
Assembly; one by members of the Assembly and Senate 
meeting in joint convention ; and one by the qualified voters 
of the city and county of San Francisco at the same time 
and in the same manner as municipal officers. Members 
were to serve for staggered terms of four years. 

The board was to have charge of the bay waterfront 
of San Francisco, "with the improvements, rights, privi- 
leges, franchises, easements, and appurtenances connected 
therewith." The duties were to keep in repair all wharves, 
seawalls, piers, etc., and to construct new ones as needed; 
to dredge docks; to collect such rents, tolls, wharfage, etc., 
as might be fixed under the authority of the act. 

Any vacancies that might occur on the board were to 

be filled by appointment by the Governor. The salary of 

each commissioner was to be $100 per month. This section 

was changed many times subsequently. Compensation was 

finally set by the Harbors and Navigation Code at $5,000 

per year for the president of the board and $3,000 for each 

of the other two commissioners. 

Stats. 186S, ch. 306, p. 406. Approved and in effect Apr. 
24, 1863. 

(95) 



Hfi HOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIOXERS SAN FRANCISCO 

1876 When the Political Code was passed in 1872, the act relat- 
ing to the Board of State Harbor Commissioners was incor- 
porated in it. An amendment to the code, passed in 1876, 
provided for the appointment of the three members of the 
board by the Governor. The term of office remained the 
same. Another section made the Governor of California 
and the Mayor of San Francisco ex officio members of the 
board for certain purposes only, mainly connected with the 
construction of new seawalls or harbor embankments. 

Code amendments 1S75-1876, ch. lO'i, p. 32. Approved and 
in effect Feb. 2S, 1876. 

1911 An act passed in 1911 amended the code sections apain. 
It provided that the members of the board should be 
appointed by the Governor with the consent of the Senate, 
and should serve at the pleasure of the Governor. 

Stats. 1911, ch. US, p. S13. Approved and in effect .Mar. 
8, 1911. 

Board of State Harbor Commissioners for San Francisco Harbor 

1937 The Harbors and Navigation Code, passed in 1937, changed 
the name of the board to Board of State Harbor Commis- 
sioners for San Francisco Harbor. 

The work of the board is organized into six units, some 
of which go back to the earliest days of harbor regulation. 
Provision was made, for example, for the appointment of 
counsel in 1864, and for the appointment of an engineer in 
1868. As the activities of the board expanded, additional 
emploj-ees were added from time to time. At present, 
besides the office of the Legal Counsel, the work is segre- 
gated as follows: Railroad Operation and Maintenance, 
Administration, Publicity, Port Operation, and Construc- 
tion and Maintenance. 

l^tats. 1937, ch. 368, p. 792. Approved May 23, 1937; in 
effect Aug. 27, 1937. 

San Francisco Harbor Bond Finance Board 

1929 The creation of a San Francisco Harbor Bond Finance Board 

was authorized by the adoption of a constitutional amendment 

in 1930. The board was to consist of the Governor, Director of 

Finance, State Controller, State Treasurer, and president of the 

Board of State Harbor Commissioners. The functions of thf 

board related to the authorization and specifications for sale of 

harbor bonds. 

Stats. 1929, ch. 833, p. 1775. Approved June 17, 1929; in 
effect upon the adoption of 8. C. A. no. 28, adopted Nov. 4, 
1930. 



BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS 
FOR THE BAY OF SAN DIEGO 



The first Board of State Harbor Commissioners for the Bay of 
San Diego was created in 1889. It was patterned more or less on the 
Board of State Harbor Commissioners for San Francisco, but never 
developed to the same extent. It was finally abolished in 1927, but 
was created a second time in 1933. 

1889 The Board of State Harbor Commissioners for the Bay 
of San Diego was to consist of three qualified electors of 
San Diego County, appointed by the Governor with the 
consent of the Senate for a staggered term of four years. 
The Governor, Mayor of San Diego, and Mayor of National 
City, were made ex officio members for special purposes 
connected with the building of seawalls. 

The board Avas to have control of the harbor, construct- 
ing and maintaining wharves and docks, dredging the har- 
bor, and managing harbor property. The commissioners 
were to establish dockage and wharfage rates, and to collect 
the same. The salary for each commissioner was set at 
$150 per month, but this was soon reduced to $25 (Stats. 
1891, ch. 77, p. 69). The board was authorized to appoint 
a secretary, assistant secretary, attorney, chief engineer, 
chief wharfinger, and such assistant wharfingers and col- 
lectors as were deemed necessary. 

Stats. 1889, ch. 211, p. 305. Approved Mar. 18, 1889. 

1927 In 1927 the Board of State Harbor Commissioners for the 
Bay of San Diego was abolished. The powers and duties of 
the board were transferred to the Department of Public 
Works. These were administered by the Division of Ports. 

Stats. 1927, ch. 516, p. 8G0. Approved May 16, 1927; in 
effect July 29, 1927. 

1933 In 1933 jurisdiction over the port of San Diego was removed 
from the Department of Public Works. The Board of State 
Harbor Commissioners for the Bay of San Diego was 
reestablished. Members were to be appointed by the Gov- 
ernor from the membership of the City of San Diego Harbor 



98 BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS — SAN DIEGO BAY 

Commissioners, and they were to serve without compensa- 
tion. Ex officio members were still the Governor, and the 
Mayoi*s of San Diego and National City. The board was to 
perform approximately the same duties as formerly, but it 
was not to employ engineers, attorneys, or other employees 
for this purpose. 

stats. 1933, ch. 992, p. 2o'>'). Appiored June Id, 1933; in 
effect Aug. 21, 1933. 

1937 Tlie final legal provisions concerning the board were estab- 
lished by the Harbors and Navigation Code in 1937. The 
section relating to appointment was the same, with the 
proviso that if members of the city harbor commission 
refused the appointment, the Governor might appoint any 
citizen of the city of San Diego to fill the vacancy. The 
board was authorized to elect a president, a secretary, and 
an assistant secretary. 

Stats. 1937, ch. 368, p. 792. Approved May 2!), 1937; in 
effect Aug. 27, 1937. 



PILOTS 



One of the early concerns of California legislators was with the 
appointment and regulation of licensed pilots for the various harbors 
along the coast. The third chapter, in fact, of the statutes of 1850 
was devoted to this subject. This was a general law providing for 
the appointment of pilots by the Governor, and setting up certain 
standards and qualifications. This act was more or less superseded, 
however, by special acts regulating individual ports which were passed 
from time to time. Complete discussion and statutory history is given 
below under the headings: San Francisco, San Diego, Humboldt, and 
San Pedro and Wilmington. 

The current legal provisions regulating pilots may be found in 
the Harbors and Navigation Code, passed in 1937. The Governor, 
with the consent of the Senate, may still "appoint pilots for each 
harbor for which there is not a board of pilot commissioners and for 
which harbor the appointment of pilots is not otherwise provided for 
by law. Pilots so appointed shall hold office at the pleasure of the 
Governor. ' ' 

SAN FRANCISCO 

The Board of Pilot Commissioners for San Francisco Bay dates 
back to 1850. In that year a special agency was established to adminis- 
ter this one port. Six years later another special board was created 
for Benicia and Mare Island. Finally, in 1864, the two boards were 
combined. The agency formed by this amalgamation is now known as 
the Board of Pilot Commissioners for the Bays of San Francisco, San 
Pablo, and Suisun. The statutory history of the two early boards is 
given below. 

Board of Pilot Commissioners for the Port of San Francisco 

1850 The Legislature established a Board of Pilot Commissioners 
for the Port of San Francisco in 1850. It was to be com- 
posed of two resident merchants and two experienced and 
resident shipmasters, who were to be appointed by the Gov- 
ernor, together with the harbor master of the port. The 
president of the Chamber of Commerce of San Francisco 
was made a member in place of the harbor master in 1852. 
Members were to serve for a term of one year, and no com- 

(99) 



100 PILOTS 

pensation was specified. The commissioners were to examine 
and license pilots for the port. 

Stats. 1850, ch. 18, p. 63. Passed Feb. 25, 1850. 

1854 An amendment passed in 1854 provided that members of the 
board should serve at tlie pleasure of the Governor. Pro- 
vision was also made for compensating the commissioners. 
Pilots were to pay five per cent of their earnings to the 
board, which sum was to cover the expenses of the office 
and of the commissioners. This principle of allocating a 
certain percentage of pilots' collections to the board has 
been followed ever since. It has remained at five per 
cent except for a brief period between 1860 and 1864, when 
it was raised to ten per cent. 

Stats. 1854, ch. U, p. 49 (Redding ed.); ch. l.->f), p. 2.73 
(Kerr ed.). Passed May 11, 185^. 

1860 The membership of the board was changed in 1860. It was 
to consist thereafter of three citizens of San Francisco 
appointed by the Governor, a person elected by the chamber 
of commerce, and the president of the chamber of com- 
merce. The next year an amendment stated simply that 
two members should be elected by the chamber of com- 
merce. Members were to hold their offices at the pleasure 
of the power appointing or electing them. 

8tat.i. 1860, ch. 251, p. 220. Approved Apr. 21. I860. 

Board of Pilot Commissioners for the Port and Harbors of Benicia and 
Mare Island 

1856 A Board of Pilot Commissioners for the Port and Harbors 
of Benicia and Mare Island was established in 1856. It 
was to consist of the Commandant of the United States Navy 
Yard at Mare Island and two residents of Solano County 
appointed by the Governor. Members were to hold office 
at the pleasure of the Governor. Pilots were to pay five per 
cent of their fees to the commissioners, which sum was to 
cover the salaries and expenses of the board. 

Stats. 18.56, ch. 51, p. 62. Approved Mar. 29, 18.56. 

Board of Pilot Examiners for the Ports of San Francisco, Mare Island, 
and Benicia 

1864 A law passed in 1864 created a Board of Pilot Exam- 
iners for the Ports of San Francisco, Mare Island, and 
Benicia. It was to consist of three experienced and compe- 
tent shipma-sters who were citizens of the United States 
and residents of San Francisco, to be appointed by and to 



PILOTS 101 

hold office at the pleasure of the Governor. Two of the 
members were to be recommended by the Board of Under- 
writers and one by the Chamber of Commerce of San 
Francisco. 

Stats. lSr>.3-1864, ch. 3Ji5, p. 389. Approved and in effect 
Apr. I,, 186/,. 

Board of Pilot Commissioners for the Ports of San Francisco, Mare Island, 
and Benicia 

1870 As the law was changed in 1870, provision was made for 
a Board of Pilot Commissioners for the Ports of San Fran- 
cisco, Mare Island, and Benicia. The Governor was to 
appoint, with the advice of the Senate, three shipmasters 
or nautical men who were United States citizens and resi- 
dents of San Francisco or Oakland, Vallejo or Benicia, or 
Brooklyn or Alameda. They were to serve at the pleasure 
of the Governor, but the term of office was not to exceed 
four years. 

Stats. 18G9-1870, ch. 243, p. 3U- Approved and in effect 
Mar. 22, 1870. 

Board of Pilot Commissioners for the Bays of San Francisco, San Pablo, 
and Suisun 

1937 The final legal provisions concerning pilots and the board 
of commissioners were incorporated in 1937 into the Harbors 
and Navigation Code. The name of the board was changed 
to Board of Pilot Commissioners for the Bays of San Fran- 
cisco, San Pablo, and Suisun. The three members, who were 
to be appointed by the Governor with the advice of the 
Senate, were to be United States citizens and residents of 
one of the following counties: San Francisco, Alameda, 
Contra Costa, Marin, San Mateo, Santa' Clara, or Solano. 
They were to hold office at the pleasure of the Governor 
for a term not to exceed four years. They were to receive 
(^ such compensation as the board itself might determine from 

< time to time, and actual expenses incurred. The necessary 

^ funds were to come, as in previous years, from five per cent 

^ of the fees collected by the pilots. 






t 



k. 



Stats. 1937, ch. 368, p. 702. Approved May 25, 1937; 



^ effect Aug. 27, 1937. 



HUMBOLDT 



The first act to provide for and regulate pilots specifically for 
Humboldt Bay was passed in 1851. In 1860 a special board was estab- 
lished for this purpose. 



102 PILOTS 

1851 A law passed in 1851 named three individuals pilots for 
the bay and harbor of Humboldt. It prescribed their duties, 
qualifications, and fees. It also authorized the Governor 
to suspend or remove any pilot for incompetency, neglect 
of duty, etc., and provided that he might appoint others 
to fill vacancies. 

Sfafs. 1851. ch. 72, p. 82'). Passed Apr. 5, 1851. 
Board of Pilot Commissioners for Humboldt Bay and Bar 

1860 A Board of Pilot Commissioners for Humboldt Bay and 
Bar was created in 1860. It was to consist of three persons 
to be appointed by and to hold office at the pleasure of the 
Governor. Members were to be Eureka residents, two of 
them business men, and the other a shipmaster or nautical 
man. The board was to appoint pilots for Humboldt Bay, 
and to administer the law generally. Compensation of 
members was set at $4 for each day aetuallj' employed in 
the discharge of their duties. 

These provisions were incorporated into the Political 
Code of 1872, the only change being that the term of office 
was limited to four years. The present Harbors and Navi- 
gation Code, passed in 1937, also contains the same specifica- 
tions. 

Stats. 1860, ch. 106, p. 7',. Approved Mar. 8, 1860. 
SAN DIEGO 

1853 The laws and regulations concerning pilots of San Fran- 
cisco were applied to those of San Diego by a law passed in 
1853. 

Stats. IS.JS, ch. 8, p. 22. Approved Jan. 27, 185S. 
Board of Pilot Commissioners for the Port of San Diego 

1872 A Board of IMlot Commissioners for the Port of San Diego 
was created in 1872. The board was to be composed of a 
resident of San Diego appointed by the Governor, and two 
ex officio members: the president of the Board of Trustees 
and the president of the Chamber of Commerce of San 
Diego. Members were to hold office during the pleasure of 
the power appointing them, not to exceed four years. 

stats. 1871-1872, ch. 435, p. 650. Approved and in effect 
Mar. 26, 1872. 

1911 Another Board of Pilot Commissioners was created in 1911. 
This board was to consist of two residents of San Diego, 



PILOTS 103 

one a citizen and the other a nautical man, appointed by 
the Governor; and the Mayor of San Diego serving ex 
officio. Members were to serve at the pleasure of the Gov- 
ernor, the term not to exceed four years. Pilots were to 
pay five per cent of their fees to the board in full com- 
pensation for its services and expenses. These provisions 
were repeated in the Harbors and Navigation Code of 1937. 

Stats. 1911, ch. 102, p. 267. Approved and in effect Mar. 
2, 1911. 

SAN PEDRO AND WILMINGTON 

1889 In 1889 an act was passed which provided for the appoint- 
ment by the Governor of not more than two persons, resi- 
dents of San Pedro, as pilots for the Port of Wilmington 
and the Bay of San Pedro. The act also established quali- 
fications and regulations for the pilots and rates of pilotage. 

stats. 1889, ch. 267, p. 1(16. Approved and in effect Mar. 
19, 1889. 

1911 The act of 1889 was repealed in 1911. 

Stats. 1911, ch. 66/,, p. 1269. Approved May 1, 1911. 



PORT WARDENS 



As in the case of pilots, provision was made by the first Lej^islature 
for the appointment of port Avardens for the various California harbors. 
These officers were required, at the request of any person interested in 
either vessel or cargo, to make a survey of anj' ship arriving in dis- 
tress or which had been damaged at sea. The current legal provisions 
regulating port wardens are contained in the Harbors and Navigation 
Code. 

1850 The act passed in 1850 provided for the appointment of two 
Port Wardens for the port and harbor of San Francisco, 
one for Sacramento, and one for every other port of entry 
within this state. The wardens were to be appointed by the 
Governor for a term of two years. The fee was set at $15 
for each survey. 

Stats. 1850, ch. ~7, p. 1!)G. Passed Apr. 10, 1850. 

Board of Port Wardens for the Port of San Francisco 

1853 The number of wardens for San Francisco was increased 
to four in 1853. They were given the designation Board 
of Port "Wardens for the Port of San Francisco. They were 
to be appointed bj' the Governor with the advice and con- 
sent of the Senate, and were to hold office until their suc- 
cessors were appointed. The Political Code of 1872 set the 
term of office at four years. Two or more of the four were 
to be master mariners. The compensation for each warden 
for each survey remained at $15, but the fee was not to 
exceed $75 for any one vessel. The regulations concerning 
San Francisco wardens were to apply to those appointed for 
other ports. 

Stats. 1853, ch. 33, p. Jfi- Approved Mar. 19, 1853. 

1937 The provisions regulating port wardens were repeated with 
very little change in 1937, when the Harbors and Naviga- 
tion Code was passed. 

Stats. 1937, ch. 368, p. 792. Approved May 25, 1937; in 
effect Aug. 27, 19S7. 



(104) 



BRIDGES 

California Toll Bridge Authority 



8 — 77467 



CALIFORNIA TOLL BRIDGE AUTHORITY 



This agency is of recent origin. It assumed important functions 
immediately after its establishment, however, with the commencement 
of plans for the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge project. 

1929 A board to be known as the California Toll Bridge Author- 
ity was created by a law passed in 1929. The membership 
consisted of the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Director of 
the Department of Public Works, Director of the Depart- 
ment of Finance, and Chairman of the California Highway 
Commission. Members were to serve without compensation, 
other than actual traveling expenses incurred in the dis- 
charge of their duties. 

The function of the California Toll Bridge Authority 
was to work closely with the Department of Public Works 
in the construction or acquisition of toll bridges and other 
toll highway crossings. The actual building of bridges was 
to be done by the department, but the authority was given 
such powers and duties as determining when and where 
bridges were necessary, authorizing bond issues, setting toll 
rates, and acquiring land by eminent domain. 

Stats. 1929, ch. 763, p. 1489- Approved June 10, 1929; in 
effect Aug. 14, 1929. 



(107) 



AGRICULTURE AND FARM FINANCE 

Agricultural Prorate Advisory Commission 
California Farm Debt Adjustment Commission 
"Waste Utilization Commission 
Poultry Improvement Commission 



AGRICULTURAL PRORATE ADVISORY 
COMMISSION 



"An act to conserve the agricultural wealth of the State of Cali- 
fornia, and to prevent economic waste in the marketing of agricultural 
crops produced in the State of California . . .", passed in 1933, 
was the first attempt by this state to control economic conditions in the 
field of agriculture. The correlation of agricultural pr£»duction to con- 
sumer demand was to be accomplished by market proration. An Agri- 
cultural Prorate Commission was created to administer the act. The 
original commission was abolished, and a new Agricultural Prorate 
Advisory Commission created, in 1939. 

Agricultural Prorate Commission 

1933 The Agricultural Prorate Commission was established in 
1933. It was to consist of nine members appointed by the 
Governor with the consent of the Senate, for staggered terms 
of four years. The members were to possess certain 
qualifications in order to represent people engaged in various 
branches of agriculture, consumers, and commercial dealers 
in agricultural products. They were to receive no com- 
pensation, but were to be reimbursed for their traveling 
expenses incurred in the performance of their duties. 

The purpose of the law was to make possible the insti- 
tution of proration programs with respect to entire crops 
by a certain percentage of the producers of the crop. The 
power of the state was placed behind such programs to 
insure their enforcement. 

Twenty-three proration programs covering fifteen dif- 
ferent agricultural commodities were instituted under the 
statute as passed in 1933 and revised in 1935 and 1938. 
The annual farm value of California crops under prora- 
tion by 1939 was in excess of $6.5,000,000. 

Stats, loss, ch. 754, P- 1969. Approved June 5, 1933; in 
effect Aug. 21, 1933. 

Agricultural Prorate Advisory Commission 

1939 The Agricultural Prorate Act of 1939 was a revision of the 
earlier acts providing for the setting up and enforcement 
of agricultural prorated marketing programs. It abolished 
( 111 ) 



112 AGRICULTURAL PRORATK ADVISORY COMMISSION 

the Agricultural Prorate Commission, and created a new 
body to be known as the Af!:ricultural Prorate Advisory 
Commission. The new commission was to consist of eight 
members appointed by the Governor, by and with the con- 
sent of the Senate, for staggered terms of four years, and 
the Director of Agriculture as a ninth, ex officio member. 
Six of the appointive members were to be engaged at the 
time of their appointment in the production of agricultural 
commodities as their principal occupation, but no two of 
them were to represent the same commodity. One appoint- 
ive member was to represent consumers generally, and he 
was to be neither a producer nor a handler of agricultural 
commodities ; and one was to be an experienced commercial 
handler of agricultural products. The compensation of 
commission members was set at $10 for each day actually 
sjjent on official business, and traveling expenses. 

The Agricultural Prorate Advisory Commission was to 
form policies and to set up rules and regulations. One mem- 
ber was to be present at hearings held in connection with 
the establishment of proration programs. The commission 
was to review the evidence and data developed as a result 
of the hearings, and was to make written findings, granting 
or denying the petition in accordance with the facts pre- 
sented. 

The Director of Agriculture was to be the executive 
officer to administer the act. He was authorized to appoint 
a secretary for the commission who would act as his execu- 
tive assistant. He was also authorized to appoint an attor- 
ney and to provide such other personnel as Was necessary. 

Stafs. J939, ch. 89i. Approved July 22, 1939. 



CALIFORNIA FARM DEBT ADJUSTMENT 
COMMISSION 



This agency was created in 1935, when farmers throughout the 
country were experiencing great financial distress. Its function was to 
lielp to solve the problems created by tliis situation, and to cooperate 
with the Federal Farm Credit Administration. 

1935 A temporary body to be known as the California Farm 
Debt Adjustment Commission was created in 1935. It was 
to consist of fifteen members to be appointed by and to 
serve at the pleasure of the Governor. Members were to 
receive no compensation; they were not even to be reim- 
bursed for traveling expenses. It was the duty of the 
commission "to assist in the voluntary adjustment of farm 
obligations and to that end to provide an agency and means 
through which farmer debtors and their creditors may 
enter into voluntary agreements to satisfactorily adjust 
their obligations." The commission was to go out of exist- 
ence on September 15, 1937. 

Statf!. 19S5, ch. 704, p. 1005. Approved July 16, 1935.; in 
effect Sept. 15, 1935. 

1937 An act passed in 1937 continued the commission in existence 

until September 15, 1939. The wording of the first section 

was also changed to allow members reasonable expenses 

incurred in attending commission meetings. 

Stats. 1931, ch. 814, p. 2295. Approved July 1, 1937; in 
effect Aug. 27, 19.37. 

1939 The life of the commission was extended in 1939 to Septem- 
ber 15, 1941. New duties were assigned to it by the Farm 
Finance Act of 1939 (Stats. 1939, ch. 929). 

Stats. 1939, ch. 940. Approved July 22, 1939; in effect Sept. 
19, 1939. 



( 113 ) 



WASTE UTILIZATION COMMISSION 



The Waste Utilization Commission, consisting of the Director of 
Agriculture, Director of Public Works, Director of Natural Resources, 
and the State Relief Administrator, all serving ex officio, was created 
in 1939 (Stats. 1939, ch. 741; approved July 13, 1939, in effect Sept. 
19, 1939). The Governor was to appoint an executive secretary for 
the commission. The commission was authorized to investigate and 
utilize the waste of agricultural, live stock, and timber industries; to 
conduct experiments and demonstrations ; and to receive and use dona- 
tions and federal subsidies. 



POULTEY IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION 



The 1939 Legislature created the Poultry Improvement Commis- 
sion (Stats. 1939, ch. 950; api?roved July 22, 1939, in effect Sept. 19, 
1939). • The commission was to consist of five members appointed by 
the Governor, chosen to represent the five major poultry districts in 
the state, and three ex officio members : the chiefs of the Poultry and 
Veterinary Divisions of the Universitj'^ of California, and the State 
Director of Agriculture. The appointed members were to serve for 
staggered terms of four years. They were to receive no compensation 
and were to be reimbursed for traveling and other expenses only when 
the money in the poultry testing project fund exceeded a certain 
sum. The commission was to conduct annually a poultry testing project 
at Modesto or some similarly situated place. 



(114) 



PUBLIC UTILITY EEGULATION 

Railroad Commission 



RAILROAD COMMISSION 
As Organized August 1, 1939 

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE AND ACCOUNTS 

LEGAL DEPARTMENT 

PUBLIC UTILITIES DKPARTMENT 

1. Gas and Electric Division 

2. Hydraulic Division 

3. Research Division 

4. Telephone and Telejiraph Division 

5. Valuation Division 

REPORTING DEPARTMENT 
SECRETARY'S DEPARTMENT 

TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT 

1. Engineering Division 

2. Division of Investigation 

3. Rate Division 

4. Safety Division 

5. Truck and Stage Division 



RAILROAD COMMISSION 



The first step to regulate railroads in California through the estab- 
lishment of an administrative agency was taken by the Legislature in 
1876. Three years later a section relating to this subject was written 
into the Constitution of 1879. This was followed the next year by a 
law to carry into effect the constitutional provisions. 

In spite of this legislation, regulation of railroads by the state was 
not adequate. Real control of railroads and public utilities was started 
in 1911, when the constitution was amended and the Public Utilities 
Act was passed. After that date the Railroad Commission assumed a 
position of vital importance in the state government. Its work was 
separated into administrative departments shortly after March 23, 
1912, the date on which the Public Utilities Act went into effect. 

Board of Transportation Commissioners 

1876 An act was passed in 1876, providing for the appointment 
by the Governor of three Commissioners of Transportation. 
The term of office was to be two years, the salary $3,000 per 
year. The commissioners were to regulate to some extent 
the operation of steam railroads within the state, "to fix 
the maximum cliarges for freights and fares, and to prevent 
extortion and discrimination on railroads in this State." 

Stats. 1875-1876, ch. 515, p. 783. Approved and in effect 
Apr. 3, 1876. 

Commissioner of Transportation 

1878 The act of 1876 was repealed in 1878. In place of the Board 
of Transportation Commissioners, the office of a single Com- 
missioner of Transportation was established. The commis- 
sioner was to be the legal successor to the board. He was to 
serve for a term of four years, with an annual salary of 
$4,000. His powers were mainly advisory. This act was 
superseded by constitutional and legislative provisions of 
1879 and 1880, but it was not specifically repealed until 
1909 (ch. 312, p. 499). 

Stats. 1877-1878, ch. 6J,1, p. 969. Approved and in effect 
Apr. 1, 1878. 

i 117 ) 



"118 RAILROAD COMMISSION 

Board of Railroad Commissioners 

1879 The Constitution of 1879 contained provisions for the regu- 
lation of railroads. Arrangements were made for the divi- 
sion of the state into three districts, from each of which 
one Railroad Commissioner was to be elected at the regu- 
lar gubernatorial elections. Their term of office was set at 
four years; the salary was to be fixed by law. The com- 
missioners were to establish freight and passenger rates for 
railroad and other transportation companies and to pre- 
scribe uniformity in accounting systems. 

Const. 1S79, article XII, section 22. 

1880 An act to define and organize the powers of the agencj' 
established by the new constitution was passed the next 
year. The Legislature named the commi.ssion the Board of 
Railroad Commissioners of the State of California. The 
salary of each commissioner was to be $4,000 per year. All 
public property belonging to the office of the Commissioner 
of Transportation was to be delivered to the new board. 
The act covered all companies operating railroads (except 
street railroads), steamships and river steamboats. This 
act also was repealed in 1909. 

Stats. 1880, ch. 59, p. .'/'i. Approved and in effect Apr. 15, 
1880. 

Railroad Commission of the State of California 

1909 A new act providing for the organization of the commission 
was passed in 1909. The laws of 1878 and 1880 were 
repealed by it. The name was changed to Railroad Com- 
mission of the State of California. The salary of the com- 
missioners was raised to $6,000, and certain added powers 
were assigned to them, but the act did not establish effective 
railroad regulation. 

Stats. 1909, ch. 312, p. 499. Approved and in effect Mar. 
19, 1909. 

1911 The Legislature made a further attempt in the regular 
session of 1911 to give force and effect to the constitutional 
provisions adopted in 1879. The act of 1909 was repealed, 
but its provisions were expanded in the new law, which con- 
tained similar administrative sections. The membership of 
the commission and the salaries remained the same. The 
powers of the commission, as limited in the constitution 



RAILROAD COMMISSION 119 

itself, related to rates and accounts of railroads and other 
transportation companies. 

Stats. 1911, ch. 20, p. 13. Approved and in effect Feb. 9, 
1911. 

1911 On October 10, 1911, the constitutional sections relating to 
railroad and public utility regulation were amended by 
popular vote. Section 22 of article XII created the Rail- 
road Commission of the State of California to consist of 
five members appointed by the Governor from the state at 
large. The Legislature was authorized, at its discretion, to 
divide the state into districts for purposes of appointment. 
The commissioners were to serve for staggered terms of six 
years. Salaries were to be fixed by the Legislature. 

Section 23 declared that public utilities should be sub- 
ject to siich control and regulation by the Railroad Commis- 
sion as the Legislature might provide. Accordingly, in 
December of the same year, the Legislature passed the 
Public Utilities Act. This law repeated and expanded the 
constitutional provisions ; defining and describing public 
utilities and their duties, the powers and duties of the 
Railroad Commission, and procedures before the commis- 
sion and the courts. The annual salary of each commis- 
sioner was set at $6,000, but raised to $8,000 in 1913 (ch. 
553, p. 934). 

This act and its later amendments, and the constitution, 
delegated such authority to the commission that rigid regu- 
lation of utilities was possible after 1911. That date marked 
the inception of the California Railroad Commission now in 
existence. 

stats. Ex. Sess. 1911, ch. H, p. 18. Approved Dec. 23, 1911; 
in effect Mar. 23, 1912. 

Department of Finance and Accounts 

The Department of Finance and Accounts was established about 
1919 or 1920. It has charge of all accounting records and gives tech- 
nical advice to the commission in matters relating to the issuance by 
utility companies of stocks, bonds and securities. These two general 
functions were originally administered by two separate divisions of the 
commission, the Department of Statistics and Accounts and the Stock 
and Bond Department. The early history is given below. 

Stock and Bond Department 

1912 In 1912, soon after the new Railroad Commission was organ- 
ized, a Stock and Bond Department was set up to investi- 



120 RAILROAD COMMISSION 

gate applications for new issues of securities, and to assist 
the commission in its activities concerned with the financial 
conditions of utilities. This department existed as a sepa- 
rate unit until about 1919. 

Department of Statistics and Accounts 

1912 "When the Railroad Commission was organized in 1912, a 
Department of Statistics and Accounts, in charge of the 
auditor, was created. It continued under this title until 
1919. 

Department of Finance and Accounts 

1919 During the fiscal year 1919-1920 the Department of Sta- 
tistics and Accounts was consolidated with the Stock and 
Bond Department, under the designation Department of 
Finance and Accounts. Statistical work was transferred to 
the Department of Information. 

Legal Department 

Provision for the appointment of an attorney by the Railroad 
Commission was made in the act passed in tlie regular legislative ses- 
sion of 1911, and repeated in the Public Utilities Act. An attorney 
was appointed, accordingly, in April, 1911, and when the work of the 
commission was organized into departments in the early part of 1912, 
a Legal Department was established. 

Power Administration 

The appointment of a Power Administrator by the Railroad Com- 
mission on June 22, 1918, was a war measure. ". . . Because of the 
dry year and the large demand for electric energy by war industries, 
the power companies in the northern portion of the state were threat- 
ened with a shortage of power which Avould have proved disastrous 
during tlic war. By mutual agreement between tlie Railroad Com- 
mission and these companies a Power Administrator was appointed who 
was given the right to make such orders affecting the relations of the 
companies to each other and to the public as he might deem necessary." 
(California. Railroad Commission. Report . . . 1918-1919, p. 
102.) The work of the Power Administi'ation ceased on June 30, 1921. 

Public Utilities Department 

The Public Utilities Department was the result of a reorganiza- 
tion in the Railroad Commission which occurred in 1937. For many 
years most of the functions administered by this department were dis- 



RAILROAD COMMISSION 121 

charged by the Engineering Department. In 1935 two of the divisions 
of the latter department were transferred to a new Transportation 
Department, and two years later the other divisions were combined with 
the Research Department to form the Public Utilities Department. 
There are at present six subdivisions in this department. 

Engineering Department 

1911 The Engineering Department was established in October, 
1911, when the chief engineer was appointed by the Rail- 
road Commission. The duties assigned to the department 
were so many and varied in character that subdivisions were 
created during the following year to handle them. By 
January, 1913, this department was the largest one in the 
commission. The subdivisions, which in the beginning were 
primarily functional rather than administrative units, were 
designated "sections" during the first few years. By 1935 
there were seven of them. See Safety Division and Engi- 
neering Division under Transportation Department (p. 124), 
and the subdivisions discussed below. 

On March 1, 1937, the Engineering Department was 
combined with the Research Department to form the Public 
Utilities Department. 

Research Department 

1931 The first Director of Research was appointed by the Rail- 
road Commission in May, 1931. He continued in office until 
August 31, 1934. For a year and a half no one functioned 
under that title, but on December 1, 1935, a new Director 
of Research was appointed. The office apparently was 
referred to as the Research Department. On March 1, 
1937, it was amalgamated with the Engineering Depart- 
ment in the new Public Utilities Department. 

1. GAS AND ELECTRIC DIVISION. 

1912 The Gas and Electric Division was established in the 
Engineering Department in 1912 when the Railroad 
Commission's organization was set up. It has caused 
important reductions in the rates of gas and electric 
utilities, and has made extensive seirvice investigations. 
The gas and electric engineer is the head of the divi- 
sion. 

2. GENERAL STAFF. 

1914 By June, 1914, a general office or administration sec- 
tion was recognized as one of the divisions of the 

9—77467 



V22 RAILROAD COMMISSION 

Engineering Department. Valuations and other special 
duties were assigned to it, from time to time, until a 
specific division might be set up to handle them. The 
General Staff was continued as a unit in the Public 
Utilities Department when it Avas created in 1937. 

3. HYDRAULIC DIVISION. 

1912 The Hydraulic Division was organized during the year 
following the creation of the Railroad Commission to 
deal with problems connected with water utilities. It 
operates under the direction of the hydraulic engineer. 

4. RESEARCH DIVISION. 

1937 "This division was organized subsequent to March 1, 
1937. Through it the Commission is advised as to the 
earning position and rate of return for the regulated 
public utilities of California . . This division 

with the cooperation of other divisions in the Public 
Utilities Department and the Department of Finance 
and Accounts, has made efforts to assemble pertinent 
engineering and accounting information relative to the 
operations of several major public utilities, thereby 
affording the basic data which is used for the nego- 
tiations of the informal rate reductions." (California. 
Railroad Commission. Letter of transmittal . 
1936-1937, p. 6.) 

5. TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH DIVISION. 

1914 During the fiscal year 1914-1915 the engineers engaged 
in telephone and telegraph matters were transferred 
from the Rate Department to the Engineering Depart- 
ment. In the latter department certain activities relat- 
ing to telephone companies had previously been 
included in the work of the Gas and Electric Division. 
After the transfer of the telephone engineers, a new 
section, designated Telephone and Telegraph Division, 
was created. It is in charge of the telephone and tele- 
graph engineer. 

6. VALUATION DIVISION. 

1926 During the fiscal year 1926-1927 a Valuation Division 
was established in the Engineering Department. The 
work of investigating and preparing reports in con- 
nection with appraisals of public utility properties had 



RAILROAD COMMISSION 123 

been carried on for several years by engineers in the 
general staff or office of the department under the 
direction of the chief engineer. At this time, however, 
a separate division in charge of the valuation engineer 
was organized. 

Reporting Department 

This department is not among those which were created at the time 
the Railroad Commission was first organized in 1912. It seems to have 
been established quite early in the existence of the commission, how- 
ever ; probably during the fiscal year 1913-1914. The Reporting Depart- 
ment makes a record of the proceedings in all formal hearings before 
the commission. 

Secretary's Department 

Both the Railroad Commission Act of 1911 and the Public Utilities 
Act provided for the appointment of a secretary by the Railroad Com- 
mission. This provision had appeared also in the earlier railroad acts. 
When the work of the commission was segregated into departments in 
1912, therefore, a section called Office was set up to handle general 
administration, correspondence, etc., and placed in charge of the secre- 
tary. By 1920, apparently, this division was designated Secretary's 
Department. 

Recorder 

Department of Information 

1917 A Department of Information, under the control of the 
Recorder, is first listed in the report of the Railroad Com- 
mission for the 1917-1918 fiscal year. 

Recorder 

1920 After two or three years the title of Department of Infor- 
mation was dropped, and under the designation Recorder 
were grouped library, publicity, statistics, and annual 
report. 

1922 By the fiscal year 1922-1923 the Recorder's Office was a 
division of the Secretary's Department. 

Service Department 

The Service Department no longer exists as a division of the 
Railroad Commission. In one form or another it was recognized as a 
specific unit from 1913 until 1926. 



124 RAILROAD COMMISSION 

Engineering Departn^ent. Service Bureau. 

1913 In April, 1913, a Service Bureau was established in the 
Engineering Department, and a railroad service expert was 
employed. The functions of the new division related mainly 
to the settlement of complaints of railroad service and the 
investigation of accidents. 

Rate Department. Service Division. 

1914 After a year as a part of the Engineering Department, the 
Service Bureau was transferi-ed, in March, 1914, to the 
Rate Department. 

Service Department 

1920 About 1920 this department seems to have acquired the 
status of a separate department of the commission. 

1926 The Service Department went out of existence on October 
1, 1926. Its major duties were transferred to the Trans- 
portation Division of the Engineering Department. For a 
later subdivision dealing with accident investigation, see 
Transportation Department — Safety Division (p. 125). 

Transportation Department 

An important reorganization took place in the Railroad Commis- 
sion in 1935. During that year it was decided to bring together in 
one department all divisions administering functions related to trans- 
portation utilities. On July 1, 1935, therefore, a Transportation 
Department was established. It was a combination of the former Rate 
Department, Auto Stage and Truck Department, and two divisions 
of the Engineering Department. It has at present five subdivisions. 

1. EXGIXEERING DIVISION. 

Engineering Department. Transportation Division. 

1912 This division was set up in 1912. It was called, during 
the first year. Railroad Division. Although it func- 
tioned as a separate division, and is so listed in the 
annual reports of the Railroad Commission, it did not 
attain the status of the gas and electric, hydraulic, and 
telephone and telegraph divisions until the fiscal year 
1921-1922, when a transportation engineer was 
appointed specifically to administer this section. The 
division had previously been in charge of the chief 
engineer. 



RAILROAD COMMISSION 125 

Engineering Division 

1935 When the Transportation Department was created in 
1935, the Transportation Division of the Engineering 
Department was transferred to it and the name was 
changed to Engineering Division. 

2. DIVISION OF INVESTIGATION. 

1935 After the Transportation Department was established in 
1935, a special division was created to assist in the enforce- 
ment of the new highway and city carriers' acts and the 
Public Utilities Act. This was called the Division of 
Investigation. In the beginning it carried on an educa- 
tional campaign among truckmen, after which it undertook 
proceedings in the courts. It also received and settled 
complaints. 

8. RATE DIVISION. 
Rate Department 

1912 A Rate Department was established in the Railroad 
Commission in 1912 when it was organized. Such a 
volume of work relating to rates for all kinds of utilities 
was assigned to it at its inception, that it was neees-- 
sary to set up several subdivisions immediately. The 
following divisions were included: Transportation; 
Telephone and Telegraph; Electric Light and Power; 
Warehouse; and Complaints. During the fiscal year 
1914-]9]5, however, the majority of these functions 
were transferred to similar divisions in the Engineer- 
ing Department. In annual reports after that date the 
only subdivision listed as a separate unit was the 
Service Division. For the history of this division, see 
Service Department (p. 123). 

Rate Division 

1935 In 1935 the Rate Department was combined with cer- 
tain other departments and divisions of the commis- 
sion to form the Transportation Department. The name 
was changed to Rate Division. 

4. SAFETY DIVISION. 

Engineering Department. Safety Division. 

1929 For many years the work of investigating accidents 
and causes of accidents in the operation of common 
carriers was handled by the Service Department of the 



126 KAILKOAD COMMISSION 

Railroad Commission. It was carried on, after 1926, 
by the Transportation Division of the Engineering 
Department. This work finally assumed such import- 
ance, however, that a new subdivision, known as the 
Safety Division, was created in the department on 
May 1, 1929. It was placed under the direction of the 
safety engineer. 

Safety Division 

1935 When the Transportation Department was established 
in 1935, the Safety Division was transferred from the 
Engineering Department to it. 

.%. 'rrUCK AND STAGE DIVISION. 

In recent years the transportation of freight and passengers 
by truck and bus has increased enormously. The division of the 
Railroad Commission concerned with regulation of such utilities 
has developed accordingly. 

Auto Stage and Truck Department 

1921 A law passed in 1917 provided for the supervision and 
regulation by the Railroad Commission of the trans- 
portation of persons and property for compensation 
over any public highwaj' of the state by automobiles, 
busses, auto trucks, stages, and auto stages. The work 
devolving upon the commission as a result of the pass- 
age of this act and its later amendments, necessitated 
by 1921 the creation of a special department. The 
Automobile, or Auto Stage, Department was estab- 
lished in May or June, 1921. By 1924 it was called 
Auto Stage and Truck Department. 

Slats, ion. ch. 213, p. 330. Approved May 10, 1917; 
in effect July 27, 1917. 

Trucl< and Stage Division 

1935 In 1935 two laws were passed which greatly expanded 
the activities of the Railroad Commission by bringing 
under its jurisdiction contract motor carriers as well 
as common carriers. These were the Highway Carriers' 
Act (ch. 223, p. 878) and the City Carriers' Act (ch. 
312, p. 1057). The acts were amended in 1937. 
Administration of these statutes resulted in the 
reorganization in which the Transportation Depart- 
ment was created. The Auto Stage and Truck Depart- 
ment became the Truck and Stage Division of the 
new department. 



RACING REGULATION 
California Horse Racing Board 



CALIFORNIA HORSE RACING BOARD 



An attempt to regulate and license horse racing and betting in 
California was made in 1926. An initiative measure on the subject 
was rejected by the voters on November 2, 1926. Nothing more was 
done until 1933, when an act was passed establishing the California 
Horse Racing Board. 

In 1933, in fact, two laws regulating racing were enacted. The 
first one, approved in May (ch. 436, p. 1127), was superseded by 
another one with identical provisions in most respects, approved in 
June. Til is act was confirmed by a constitutional amendment adding 
section 2r)a to article IV, adopted June 27, 1933. 

1933 The law passed in 1933 provided that the California Horse 
Racing Board should consist of three members (five, accord- 
ing to the first <ict) appointed by the Governor for stag- 
gered terms of four years. Members were to serve with- 
out compensation other than necessary traveling expenses. 
The function of the board was to regulate, license, and 
supervise horse racing and wagering on horse races. Only 
the pari mutuel method of wagering was to be used, and the 
board was to collect a certain percentage of the pools. 
Participants and officials were to be licensed. 

Stats. 193S, ch. 769, p. 20.'i6. Approved June 5, 1933; in 
rffcrt .Tunc 37, 193^. 



(129) 



REGULATION OF PROFESSIONS 

State Bar of California 

Board of Osteopathic Examiners 

State Board of Chiropractic Examiners 



STATE BAR OF CALIFORNIA 



The function of examining and passing upon the qualifications 
of those who wished to practice law in California was early assigned to 
the supreme court. It was not until 1919 that a special state board was 
created to perform this dut3^ Finally, in 1927, the responsibilities 
of the State Board of Bar Examiners were turned over to a special 
committee of the State Bar of California. The current legal pro- 
visions affecting the State Bar may be found in the Business and Pro- 
fessions Code. Chapter 34 of the Statutes of 19;?9 made the State 
Bar Act a chapter in this code. 

state Board of Bar Examiners 

1919 A new section added to the Code of Civil Procedure in 
1919 created the State Board of Bar Examiners. The 
supreme court was empowered to appoint three competent 
attorneys to examine applicants for admission as attorneys 
and counselors at law. The members of the board were 
to hold office at the pleasure of the supreme court. They 
were each to receive as an annual salary a sum not to exceed 
$1,000, to be determined by the supreme court. 

^7rtfs. 1919, ch. 31,7, p. 721. Approved May 18, 1919; in 
effect July 22, 1919. 

1931 The State Bar Act of 1927, to all practical purposes, 
abolished the State Board of Bar Examiners. The sections 
of the Code of Civil Procedure relating to the board, how- 
ever, were not repealed until 1931. 

^tats. 1931, ch. 861, p. 1761. Approved June 12, 1931; in 
effect Aug. V,, 1931. 

State Bar of California 

1927 The State Bar Act, passed in 1927, created the State Bar 
of California as a public corporation, and defined its mem- 
bership, organization, powers and duties, etc. The adminis- 
trative body was to be the Board of Governors of the State 
Bar. It was to consist of one member elected from each 
congressional district in California, and four members elec- 
ted from the state at large. The term of office was set at 
one year. 

( 133 ) 



134 STATE BAR 

A special committee to be appointed by the Board of 
Governors was authorized to take over tlie duties of the 
State Board of Bar Examiners by virtue of the following: 
"With the approval of the supreme court, and subject to 
the provisions of this act, the board shall have power to fix 
and determine the qualifications for admission to practice 
law in this state, and to constitute and appoint a committee 
of not more than seven members with power to examine 
applicants and recommend to the supreme court for admis- 
sion to practice law those who fulfill the requirements." 
Subsequently this section was modified somewhat ; the phrase 
limiting the membership of the committee to seven in nvim- 
ber was deleted in 1931. 

Stats. 1927, c/i. 3i, p. 38. Appioted Ma,: 31, 1927; in effect 
July 29, 1927. 

1920 Tlie term of office of the members of the Board of Gov- 
ernors was changed to two years in 1929. Eight governors 
were to be elected in every even-numbered year and seven 
in every odd-numbered year. 

Stnts. 1929, ch. 708, p. 12r,C. Approved .June 6, 1929; in 
effect Aug. 1',, 1929. 

1933 In 1933 the state was divided into specific State Bar Dis- 
tricts, and pi'ovision was made for the election of members 
to the Board of Governors from these districts rather than 
from congressional districts. At the same time it was pro- 
vided that the governors should be elected thereafter for 
staggered terms of three j^ears. 

Stats. 19S3, ch. 1,30, p. 1087. Approved May IG, 1933: in 
effect Aug. 21, 1933. 



BOAED OF OSTEOPATHIC EXAMINERS 



The regulation of osteopathy as a specific branch of medicine was 
started in 1901. When the Medical Practice Act of 1907 was passed, 
osteopathy and all other branches of medicine were placed under the 
control of a composite examining board. After 1913, until the initiative 
measure of 1922 was passed, the practice of osteopathy received no 
special recognition, but was supervised in the same manner as all 
medical practice by the Board of Medical Examhiers. 

State Board of Osteopathic Examiners 

1901 General regulation of the medical profession was begun in 
1876 with the creation of boards of medical examiners. For 
the complete history, see Board of Medical Examiners, in 
v. 1, p. 189. In 1901, however, the system of treating 
disease known as osteopathy was separated from the prac- 
tice of medicine or surgery in general, and a special State 
Board of Osteopathic Examiners was created. The board 
was to consist of five persons having certain qualifications 
who were appointed by the Osteopathic Association of the 
State of California for a term of two years. The board was 
to issue licenses to applicants wishing to practice osteopathy. 

Stats. 1901, ch. 99, p. 113. Became a law and trent info 
efect Mar. 9, 1901. 

1907 The act of 1901 was repealed in 1907. Osteopathy, however, 

was represented on the Board of Medical Examiners which 

was created at that time. Two members of the board were 

to be appointed by the Governor from a list of four names 

submitted by the Osteopathic Association of California. A 

separate certificate for osteopathy was to be issued by the 

board. This situation was changed in 1913, when the present 

Medical Practice Act was passed, and osteopathy was no 

longer accorded special recognition. 

l^tats. 1901, ch. 212, p. 252. Approved Mar. H, 1907; in 
effect May 1, 1907. 

Board of Osteopathic Examiners 

1922 The Osteopathic Act, an initiative measure passed in 1922, 
created the Board of Osteopathic Examiners of the State 
of California. The board was to consist of five members 

( 135 ) 



13(5 BOARD OF OSTEOPATHIC EXAMINERS 

appointed by the Governor for staggered terms of three 
years. All members were to be graduates of osteopathic 
schools who held unrevoked licenses to practice in Cali- 
fornia. Tlicy were to receive no compensation except travel- 
ing expenses and $10 for each day of actual service in the 
discharge of official duties. The new board succeeded to the 
powers and duties of the Board of IMedical Examiners in 
regard to licensing osteopatlis, and was required to enforce 
the provisions of the state medical practice act in so far 
as it applied to o.steopathic scliools and practitioners. 

stats. 1923, p. xciii. Initiative measure approved by eleetors 
^^ov. 7, 1922; in effect Dec. 21, 1922. 



STATE BOARD OF CHIliOPRACTIC EXAMINERS 



The State Board of Chiropractic Examiners was established in 
1922 by an initiative measure approved November 7 and in effect 
December 21 of that year. The board was to consist of five members 
appointed by the Governor for staggered terms of three years. Mem- 
bers were required to possess certain qualifications and to be graduates 
of a regularly incorporated chiropractic school or college. No two 
members whose first diplomas were issued by the same school or college 
of chiropractic might serve on the board simultaneously. The only 
compensation allowed was traveling expenses and .$10 for each day 
actually spent in the discharge of official duties. The function of the 
board was to examine applicants and to issue and revoke licenses to 
practice chiropractic, and to adopt rules and regulations for the per- 
formance of its work. 



STATE UNIVERSITY 

University of California 



10 — 77467 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



The majority of California state institutions come under the juris- 
diction of one or another of the large government departments. They 
have been described, therefore, in the first volume of this study. The 
University of California, however, has a unique position in the state 
government. A brief outline of the constitutional and statutory pro- 
visions concerning it is included here. No attempt has been made to 
tell the complete story of the growth of the institution or of the 
evolution of its many ramifications, as this material has been covered 
thoroughly in the various published histories of the University. 

The organic act establishing the University of California was 
passed in 1868. In the first sixty years the institution exhibited such 
amazing vitality in its development that it came to serve more full- 
time resident students than any other college or university in the 
United States. By 1938 the Berkeley campus alone led all colleges 
and universities in the country. The university has in all, however, 
seven campuses. Besides the largest and most widely known elements 
of the institution, namely, those on the Berkeley campus and the Los 
Angeles campus, other units hold strategic positions. The College of 
Agriculture offers supplementary instruction at Davis, on the Univer- 
sity Farm; and at Riverside, site of the Citrus Experiment Station. 
At Pomona is the W. K. Kellogg Institute of Animal Husbandry. The 
Medical Center, with research laboratories, clinics, and a hospital, is in 
San Francisco; and in that city also are the Hastings College of the 
Law and the California School of Fine Arts. Centers of advanced 
research are the Lick Astronomical Observatory, on Mount Hamilton, 
and the Scripps Institute of Oceanography at La Jolla. 

1849 The first mention of a state university appeared in the Con- 
stitution of 1849. One section required the Legislature to 
manage all lands received from the United States or other 
sources for the use of a university. The money obtained 
from the sale or rent of such lands was to be put into a 
permanent fund, the interest of which was to be applied to 
the support of the institution. Nothing was said about the 
actual organization or administration of the university. 

Const. 1849, article IX, sec. 4- 

1863 In the years following the adoption of the Constitution of 
1849, little was done toward the actual establishment of a 
university. Succeeding Legislatures considered measures 
( 139 ) 



140 UNIVERSITY OK CALIFORNIA 

both for its creation, and for the diversion of university 
funds to aid existing incorporated colleges instead. The 
United States Congress gave grants of land to the state 
for a "seminary of learning" and for an agricultural col- 
lege. A definite step was taken, however, in 1863, when the 
Legislature adopted a concurrent resolution constituting the 
State Geologist, the Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
and the Sur\eyor General a special board of commissioners 
to investigate tlie feasibility of establishing a state univer- 
sity. The commission was to report by December, 1863. 
The projected institution was to include an agricultural 
college, a school of mines, and a museum which should 
include the geological collection of the state. 

.S7n/s. 1803, A. C. R. no. SI, p. 793. Adopted Apr. 22, 1863. 

1866 An act to establish an Agricultural, Mining, and Mechanical 
Arts College was passed in 1866. The college was to be 
under the control of a board of directors consisting of the 
Governor, president of the State Agricultural Society, presi- 
dent of the Mechanics' Institute of the City and County of 
San Fi-ancisco, and five other members. These five mem- 
bers were to be elected by the Legislature; three of them 
were to be from mining counties, and the other two from 
agricultural counties. They were to serve for a term of 
two yeai-s. They were to receive no compensation other 
tlian expenses incurred while on official business. The board 
was to select a site for the college, to authorize expenditures, 
and, in general, to administer the institution. 

Stats. 1865-1866, ch. 408, p. 50i. Approved Mar. 31, 1866. 

1868 The University of California was finally established by a 
statute passed in 1868, which superseded the law of 1866. 
The latter act was repealed, and the Board of Directors of 
the Agricultural, Mining, and Mechanic Arts College was 
ordered to turn over all property and effects to the Regents 
of the University of California. The Board of Regents, 
which was to manage the new institution, was to consist 
of twenty-two members. Ex officio members included the 
Governor, Lieutenant Governor, speaker of the Assembly, 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, president of the State 
Agricultural Society, and the president of the Mechanics' 
Institute of the City and County of San Francisco. Eight 
members were to be appointed by the Governor, with the 
advice of the Senate, for .staggered terms of sixteen years. 
Eight additional honorary members were to be selected by 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 141 

the official and appointed members, and they, too, were to 
serve for staggered terms of sixteen years. The organiza- 
tion of the university into special colleges, and many regu- 
lations for its administration, were also included in the act. 
The university was to be located on the grounds donated 
to the state by the College of California. It was, in fact, an 
outgrowth of the latter institution. To give the history of 
the College of California in the briefest possible manner: 
it was organized as the Contra Costa Academy on June 20, 
1853; chartered by the State Board of Education as the 
College of California on April 13, 1855; and continued as 
the College of Letters of the University of California after 
1868. 

stats. 1867-1868, ch. 2U, p. ZJ/S. Approved and in effect 
Mar. 23, 1868. 

1879 In the new constitution, adopted in 1879, it was provided 
that the University of California should constitute a pub- 
lic trust and that its organization and government should 
be perpetually continued in the form and character pre- 
scribed by the organic act creating it in 1868. It was to be 
kept entirely free from all political and sectarian influences. 
There were also provisions concerning the sale of public 
lands and the investment of the proceeds in a fund for the 
support of the university. A College of Agriciilture 
specifically was to be included in the university. 
Const. 1819, article IX, sec. 9. 

1918 As the constitution was amended in 1918, the Board of 
Regents was designated as the corporation which should 
administer the University of California. The board was 
given full powers of organization, subject only to such 
legislative control as might be necessary to insure com- 
pliance with the terms of the endowments of the univer- 
sity and the security of its funds. The board was to con- 
sist of sixteen members appointed by the Governor, and eight 
ex officio members as follows: the Governor, Lieutenant 
Governor, speaker of the Assembly, Superintendent of Pub- 
lie Instruction, president of the State Board of Agriculture, 
president of the Mechanics Institute of San Francisco, presi- 
dent of the alumni association of the university, and the 
acting president of the university. The appointive mem- 
bers were to serve for staggered terms of sixteen years. 
The other provisions of the original section were retained 
in the amended form. 

Const. 1879 article IX, sec. 9, as amended Nov. 5, 1918. 



DISASTER PREPAREDNESS 

State Emergency Council 



z^- 



STATE EMERGENCY COUNCIL 



In the past few years various attempts have been made, particu- 
larly by municipalities, to draw up preparedness plans in order to 
have a working-organization in readiness whenever disaster might 
strike. In 1929 the State of California took a similar step in creating 
the State Emergency Council. 

1929 The State Emergency Council was established in 1929. It 
was to consist of the heads of the Departments of Finance, 
Public Works, Military and Veterans' Affairs, and Public 
Health; a member representing the American Legion; one 
representing the American Red Cross; a member repre- 
senting the transportation interests of California ; one from 
the business organizations of the state; and one peace 
officer. The members were to be appointed by the Governor 
for a term of two years, and were to serve without pay other 
than expenses incurred in the performance of official 
business. 

The purpose of the council was to prepare a plan and 
to consider ways and means for dealing with possible future 
emergencies in the state. The Governor was required to 
declare, in times of such disasters as fires, floods, earth- 
quakes, etc., that an emergency existed. Under certain con- 
ditions he was to designate officers or departments to take 
charge of necessary relief work. The State Emergency 
Council was to cooperate in such activities. 

StaU. 1929, ch. 662, p. 1111. Approved June 3, 1929; in 
effect Aug. 11,, 1929. 



(145) 



LEGISLATIVE ASSISTANCE 

Legislative Counsel Bureau 

California Code Commission 

Commission on Uniform State Laws 

California Commission on Intergovernmental Cooperation 



LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL BUREAU 



Strictly speaking, a discussion of the Legislative Counsel Bureau 
should not be included in this outline, inasmuch as this agency is 
attached to the legislative, rather than the administrative, branch of 
the state government. In order to enhance the reference value of the 
work, however, all agencies of the state have been included outside of 
the Legislature itself and the California courts. 

Moreover, although the principal duty of the Legislative Counsel 
is to assist members of the Legislature in drafting bills, resolutions, 
and constitutional amendments, and to serve legislative committees both 
during and between sessions, he is also subject to call of any officer 
of the executive or judicial branches of the government in the prepara- 
tion or consideration of legislative measures. He is required to prepare 
certain publications such as legislative digests and statutory indexes; 
and he has served on various governmental commissions from time to 
time. 

1913 The Legislative Counsel Bureau was created in 1913. A 

Legislative Counsel Bureau Board was also created at the 

same time. The latter was to consist of five members, of 

which one was to be the Governor or someone acting for 

him at his request, two were to be chosen by the Senate 

from its members for a term of four years, and two were 

to be chosen by the Assembly from its members for a term 

of two years. The two senators were to be of different 

political parties, and this restriction applied also to the two 

assemblymen. The function of the board was to appoint 

and to supervise the activities of a chief of the Legislative 

Counsel Bureau. This officer was to serve for a term of four 

years ; although provision was made for his removal before 

the expiration of the period. His salary was to be set by 

the board. The members of the board were to receive no 

compensation other than expenses incurred in the discharge 

of official duties. 

The duty of the Legislative Counsel Bureau, briefly 

stated, was to prepare and to assist in the preparation, 

amendment, and consideration of legislative bills. 

Stats. 1913. ch. 322, p. 626. Approved May 26, 1913; in 
effect Aug. 10, 1918. 

(149) 



150 LEQISLATrVE COUNSEL BUREAU 

1917 In 1917 the Legislature changed the method of selecting 
the chief of the Legislative Counsel Bureau, with conse- 
quent abolition of the Legislative Counsel Bureau Board. 
The chief was given the title of Legislative Counsel of Cali- 
fornia ; and it was provided that he was to be appointed by 
and to hold his office at the pleasure of the Governor. The 
salary was set at $4,000 per annum. The Legi-slative Coun- 
sel was authorized to employ such professional, clerical, and 
other employees as were necessary to carry on the work of 
the bureau. The functions of the Legislative Counsel were 
expanded at this time. 

stats. JOn, ch. 727, p. 1398. .\pp,oicd .!/«// .!/. IUI7: in 
rffect July SO, 1917. 

19;}1 An amendment passed in 1931 changed once more the 
method of appointing the Legislative Counsel. He was to 
be selected thereafter every two years before the first 
Wednesday after the first Monday after the first day of 
Januarjf in each odd-numbered year by the Senate and 
Assembly in joint session. If the office fell vacant while 
the liCgislature was not in session, selection was to be made 
by a committee consisting of the speaker of the Assembly, 
the speaker pro tempore of the Assembly, the president pro 
tempore of the Senate, and the chairman of the finance com- 
mittee of the Senate. 

stats. 1931, ch. S.7.), p. l7'iS. .Ipprorcd .lunv I >. I'.).]l; in 
effect .\ug. IJ,, 1931. 



CALIFORNIA CODE COMMISSION 



The present California Code Commission was established in 1929 
for the purpose of revising: the laws of the state. The idea of com- 
piling the statutes into codes is not a new one. Twice before com- 
missions have been created for that purpose, the first one in 1868 and 
the second in 1895. 

To the earliest commission was assigned the tremendous task of 
arranging a large portion of the laws passed between 1850 and 1868 
into four codes. As a result of the labors of this body the Political, 
Civil, and Penal Codes, and the Code of Civil Procedure, were passed 
in 1872. The second body made further additions and corrections in 
these codes. The present commission has undertaken the ambitious pro- 
gram of compiling also codes of laws in special fields. Several codes 
like the Fish and Game Code and the Labor Code have already been 
completed and accepted by legislative enactment. 

More complete discussion and statutory references for all these 
bodies are given below. 

Commission for the Revision of the Laws 

1868 A law passed in 1868 constituted three named individuals 

a commission for the revision and compilation of the laws 

of the state. The commissioners were to finish their work 

by July 1, 1869, delivering the codes to the next Legislature 

for approval. They were to receive a salary of $400 a month 

for the time actually engaged in the performance of their 

duties. 

Stats. 1867-1868, ch. 365, p. 435. Approved and in effect 
Mar. 28, 1868. 

1870 A new commission to continue the labors of the one 
appointed in 1868 was created in 1870. It was to consist 
of three members of the legal profession appointed by the 
Governor. The earlier commission was to deliver all its 
documents and books to the new body. Not only was this 
commission to revise and compile all the statutes of the 
state, but it was also to recommend additional legislation 
for the clarification and completion of existing legislation, 
and to prepare and present the necessary bills. Its work 
was to be completed by November 1, 1871. The salary of 

( 151 ) 



152 CALIFORNIA CODE COMMISSION 

the commissioners was set at $6,000 a year for the time 
actually engaged in revision and in the preparation of their 
report. 

stats. 1869-1870, ch. 516, p. 77^. Approved and in effect 
Apr. /,, 1S70. 

Commissioners for the Revision and Reform of the Law 

1895 Bj' 1895 further work on the state laws seemed necessary. 
An act passed in that year provided for a commission of 
three members, appointed by the Governor for a term of 
two years. Tlie commissioners were to possess certain 
qualifications : they were to be of different political parties, 
to belong to the legal profession, to have practiced law in 
this state for more than five years prior to appointment, and 
to have been admitted to practice before the Supreme Court. 
The commissioners were to revise the codes and statutes, 
to give suggestions to the Legislature for the promotion of 
the public welfare, to suggest bills for correcting errors and 
omissions, to serve as legislative advisors, and, in general, 
to clarify the state laws. They Avere to receive as salary 
$4,000 each per annum. 

l^tats. 1895, ch. 222, p. 31/5. Approved and in effect Mar. 
28, 1895. 

1903 The act ot 1895 was amended in 1903. In place of the three 
commissioners, provision was made for the appointment by 
the Governor of one Commissioner for the Revision and 
Reform of the Law. He was to have the same qualifications 
as those prescribed for the earlier commissioners. He was 
to hold office for two years only, and the act was to become 
inoperative on May 1, 1905. Later amendments in 1905 
and 1907, however, continued the work until 1911. The 
salary of the commissioner was set at $3,600 a year. 

stats. 1903, ch. 362, p. 470. Approved Mar. 25, 1903; in 
effect Apr. 15, 1903. 

California Code Commission 

1929 The California Code Commission was created in 1929. It 
was to consist of nine members appointed by the Governor. 
No term of office was specified, but the commission was 
required to make its report by December 15th preceding 
the next regular session of the Legislature. The chief of 
the Legislative Counsel Bureau was to be the secretaiy. 

The function of the commission was to codify, con- 
solidate, revise, or compile the statutes of California, and 



CALIFORNIA CODE COMMISSION 153 

to prepare a statutory record. Members were to serve with- 
out compensation, but were allowed expenses incurred in 
traveling and in the actual discharge of their duties. The 
first commission was due to go out of existence in 1931, but 
later amendments continued the act of 1929 in force, and 
the commission is still active at the present time. 

Stats. 1929, ch. 7',0, p. 1427. .ipproved .June 10, 1929; in 
effect Aug. ///, W29. 



■7467 



COMMISSION ON UNIF01?M STATE LAWS 



The National ConfereiiL-e of Commissiouers on Uniform yt;ite Laws 
was organized in 1892. Ever since then there have been yearly meet- 
ings of representatives from a majority of the states. The purpose, as 
indicated by the name of the conference, has been to draft laws on 
subjects where uniformity seems desirable and practicable. These uni- 
form laws may then be adopted by the legislatures in the different states. 

California created a commission to cooperate in this movement as 
early as 1897. It was abolished in 1901, however, and another com- 
mission was not established until 1927. 

Commission for the Promotion of Uniformity of Legislation in the United 
States 

1897 A law passed in 1897 provided that the Governor should 
appoint three Commissioners for the Promotion of Uniform- 
ity of Legislation in the United States. No term of office 
was specified. No compensation was provided for mem- 
bers, but the commission was allowed $500 a year to cover 
traveling and other expenses. The commissioners were "to 
ascertain the best means to effect an assimilation and uni- 
formity in the laws of the States", and to represent Cali- 
fornia at the national conferences. 

.S//I/.1. IS;>7. eh. 80, p. 7}. .[piiinml iiiiil in rffrrt Miif. .'». 
1897. 

1901 The act of 1897 was repealed in 1901. 

statu. HXIf. rh. .'I'l. p. 'i9. .\ppror,:t anil in effrct Frh. 21',, 
1901. 

Commission on Uniform State Laws 

1927 A new Commission on Uniform State Laws was created by 
the Legislature in 1927. It was to consist of three commis- 
sioners, each of whom was to be a member of the bar of this 
state in good standing, appointed by the Governor. The 
term of office was set at four years. No compensation was 
allowed commissioners, but the sum of $500 per year (raised 
to $1,000 in 1929) was provided for traveling and other 
expenses of the commission. 

Stats. 1927, ch. ^98, p. 838. ,\ppiorrd if a;, If,, 1927: in 
effect July 29, 1927. 

( 154 ) 



CALIFORNIA COMMISSION ON INTERGOVERN- 
MENTAL COOPERATION 



The Council of State Governments was organized in 1935, as an 
outgrowth of the American Legislators' Association. By March, 1939, 
thirty-eight states had joined the council, through appointment of 
special commissions on interstate cooperation. California took the 
necessary step in 1938. 

1938 In order to foster interstate cooperation, and to affiliate 
with the American Legislators' Association and the Council 
of State Governments, a Senate Concurrent Resolution, 
passed in the special session of 1938, established the Cali- 
fornia Commission on Intergovernmental Cooperation. The 
commission Avas to be composed of the five members of a 
regular Senate standing committee known as the Senate 
Committee on Intergovernmental Cooperation ; the five mem- 
bers of a similar Assembly committee ; and the five members 
of tlie Governor 's Committee on Intergovernmental Coopera- 
tion. The latter committee was to consist of five members 
appointed by the Governor for a term of one year, or until 
their successors were appointed. The Governor, the presi- 
dent of the Senate, and the speaker of the Assembly were to 
be ex officio, nonvoting members of the general commission. 
All members of the commission were to serve without com- 
pensation. 

The function of the California Commission on Inter- 
governmental Cooperation was to carry forward the par- 
ticipation of this state as a member of the Council of State 
Governments, and to cooperate in all possible ways with the 
various governments in the United States. 

The committees and commission established by the act 
were to be known informally as the Senate Cooperation 
Committee, the Assembly Cooperation Committee, the Gov- 
ernor 's Cooperation Committee, and the California Coopera- 
tion Commission. 

^tats. Ex. Sess. J938, S. O. R. no. 7, p. JCG. Filed with 
Secretary of State Mar. 16, 193S. 

1930 In the 1939 legislative session an act, instead of a resolution, 
was passed. The purpose of this was to give the committees 
( ir,.-, ) 



156 COMMISSION ox IXTKRr.OVKKN.MKNTAL COOPERATION 

continuity of existence beyond the current legislative term. 
The wording of the new law, however, was quite similar 
in most respects to the 1938 resolution. The commission 
was to consist of fifteen members ; the Senate and Assembly 
committees, and "Five officials of the State appointed by 
the Governor who shall hold office during the pleasure of 
the Governor and one of whom shall be designated by him 
as chairman of the commission." 

stilts. 1939: ch. 3~(1. Approved June J, 1939. 



JUDICIAL ADMINISTRATION 

Judicial Council 

Commission on Qualifications (Judicial) 



JUDICIAL COUNCIL 



As in the case of the Legislative Counsel Bureau, the Judicial 
Council perhaps should not be included in a study of this type. It is 
strictly a part of the judicial rather than the administrative branch 
of government. In an attempt, however, to make this outline as inclu- 
sive as possible, only the Legislature and the courts themselves have 
been omitted. 

From one point of view the Judicial Council has certain adminis- 
trative duties, as it surveys the condition of business in the several 
courts for the purpose of simplifying and improving the administration 
of justice, and submits such suggestions to the courts as may seem 
in the interest of uniformity and expedition of business; marshals 
judicial manpower to meet as far as possible the needs of all courts, 
particularly trial courts when illness or unavoidable absence or dis- 
qualification of a judge occurs, or calendars become congested ; adopts 
and amends rules of practice and procedure for the courts ; and makes 
such recommendations to the Governor and the Legislature as it deems 
proper. 

The Judicial Council was created by an amendment adding section 
la to article VI of the Constitution, adopted by a vote of the people 
on November 2, 1926. It consists of the chief justice or acting chief 
justice, and of one associate justice of the supreme court, three justices 
of district courts of appeal, four judges of superior courts, one judge of 
a police or municipal court, and one judge of an inferior court, selected 
by the chief justice. The term of office is two years, but appointment 
terminates at once in the event of a member ceasing to be a judge of 
the court from which he was assigned. The members of the Judicial 
Council receive no compensation for their services as such, but are 
allowed necessary expenses for travel, board and lodging incurred 
in the performance of official duties. 



( ir/t ) 



COMMISSION ON QUALIFICATIONS (JUDICIAL) 



An initiative measure, adopted by the people on November 6, 1934, 
added section 26 to article VI of the constitution. This section changed 
the method of succession and selection to vacancies in office of appellate 
and supreme court justices in California. As a new element, a Com- 
mission on Qualifications was created by the amendment. The func- 
tion of the commission was to confirm, by a majority vote, the appoint- 
ments of the Governor or his nominations to fill judicial offices in the 
courts above indicated. 

The Commission on Qualifications consists of (1) the chief justice 
or acting chief justice of the supreme court; (2) the senior presiding 
justice of the district court of appeal of the district in which a justice 
of a district court of appeal is to serve, or, in the case of the nomina- 
tion or appointment of a justice of the supreme court, the presiding 
justice who has served longest as such upon any of the district courts 
of appeal; and (3) the xVttorney General. 

This method may become applicable to the superior court within 
a county upon adoption by its electors. 

Another duty of the Commission on Qualifications is concerned 
with the retirement for permanent di.sability of a judge under Section 
3 of the Judges' Retirement Law (Stats. 1937, ch. 770, p. 2204). 



( 160 ) 



INDEX 



Page 
Accounting Division (Controller). 23 
Accounting Division (Reclamation 

Hoard) 81 

Accounting Division (State Re- 
lief Administration) 61 

Accounting Section (Department 

of Employment) 53 

Accounts, Department of Finance 

and (Railroad Cominisalon) - 119 
Accounts, Department of Statistics 

and (Railroad CommisHion) - 120 
Accounts Ai\d Statistics, Division 
of (Department of Employ- 
ment) 54 

AoMlNlSTliATlVE AuDiT, Bureau of 

Soiial and 65 

Advisory Council, State 53 

agbicultukai prorate advisory 

Commission 111 

Alcoholic Beverage Control Di- 
vision 31 

Appeals Bureau 54 

Archives, Keeper of tue 12 

Assessment Division (Reclama- 
tion Board) 81 

Assessment Standards, Division of 35 

Attorney General 17 

Audit, Bureau of Social and Ad- 
ministrative 65 

Auditing Section (Vontrutlei) 29 

Auditing Section (Department of 

Employment) 53 

Auto Stage and Truck Depart- 
ment 126 



Page 

Bond Deposit Department 21 

Bond Finance Board, San Fran- 
cisco Harbor 96 

Bridge Authority, California Toll 107 



B 

Ballot Machines, State Commis- 
sion on Voting or 

Bank and Corporation Franchise 

Tax Act 

Bar E.vAMlNEKs, State Board of 

Bar of California, State 

Benicia and Mare Island, Board 
of i'ilot Commissioners tor 

the Port and Harbors of 

Beverage Control Division, Alco- 
holic 

Beverage Tax Division 

Bond Act. Unemployment Relief 

Bond Certification Commission, 

California 

Bond Commission, Irrigation Dis- 
trict 

lio.ND Dkpartment, Stock and 
( Railroad Commission ) 



(Jalifornia 



-. See name of 
Code Commis- 



13 

41 
133 
133 



100 

34 
34 

58 

88 

88 

119 



agency (e.g., 

sion, California) 

Camp Committee, State Labor 

Camps Opeirations Department — 

C.VRRIERS' Act, City 

Carriers' Act, Highway 

Cashiering Section (Department 

of Employment) 

Central Vaxley Project Act 

Chiropractic Examiners, State 

Board of 

City Carriers' Act 

Civil Service Commission, State — 

44, 

Civil Works Administration 

Civilian Conservation Corps 

Code Commission, California 

Collection Agency License Divi- 
sion 

Colorado River Board 

Colorado River Commission of 

California 

Commodity Distribution, Bureau 

of 

Commodity Division, Surplus 

Community Relations, Bureau of_ 
Compensation. Division of T'li- 

emplo.vnient 

Comptroller 

Conservation Commission 

(.'ONSERVATION COMMITTEE, State 

Soil 

CoNSEaivATiON Corps, Civilian 

Conservation District Act, Cali- 
fornia Water 

Construction Department (State 
Relief Administration) 

Controller 

.__12, 22, 33, 41, 45, 58, 84, 

Cooperation, California Commission 
on Intergovernmental 

Cooperative Service, Division of 
Self-Help 

('ORPORATioN Department 

floRPORATiON Franchise Tax Act, 
Bank and 

Corporation Income Tax Act 

CoitPORATioN License Tax Dep.uit- 

MENT 



67 

69 

126 

120 

53 

84 

136 
126 

47 

59 

62 

151 

10 
90 

90 

07 
67 
60 

53 
23 
82 

92 
62 

87 

70 

96 

155 

69 
10 

41 
42 

11 



( 161 ) 



](i- 



INDEX 



Pnge 

Corporation License Tax Exemp- 
tion Board 12 

Corporation Tax Coij.ection De- 

i'aktmen't 27 

County Administration, Divisidii 

of 03 

County Administration, Divisinn 

of Social Service and CI 

County Operations. Hureau of 03 



Debt Awtstment Commission, 

C.iliforiiin Fann 

Delinquent Tax Department 

DisBrRsiNo Division, S. K. A 

District Bond Commission. Irriga- 
tion 

Districts Securities Commission, 

Cnlifiirni.T 

Drainage Commissioners, Board of 

Drainage District, Board of Com- 

iriissioncrs of the Sacrament ) 

liiver 

Drainage DisntiCT, Sacramento 

Drainage DiSTKUT, Sacramento and 
San Joai|iiin 



Education Department, Enierseiicy 

Elections. Bureau of 

Electric Division-. Gas and 

Emergency Council, State 

Emergency Education Department 
Emergency Relipt Administra- 
tion, State 

Employees, Cominission on Pensions 

of Stale 

E.Mi'i.OYEEs" Ketirement System, 

State 

Employment, Department of 

Employment Agencies, Division of 

State 

Employment Bureaus, State Fre«_ 
Employment Commission, Califor- 
nia 

Employment Exchange, California 

Labor and 

Employment Service, California 

Encinefring Department (fitate 
I'.iiicrpency lieVuf Atlmitiintra- 

floii ) 

Engineering Division (Railroad 

Commission) 

Enoineeuino Division {Reclama- 
tion Hoard) 

Equalization, State Board of--32, 
KxEMiTloN Board, Corporation Li- 
cense Tax 



113 
25 
20 

,SS 
70 



SO 



Page 

Family Welfare Division t>2 

Farm Debt Ad.tu.stment Commis- 
sion, California 113 

Farm Finance Act 113 

Federal-State Water Resources 

Commission, Calif'iniiii .Joint S3 

Field Service Division <i2 

Finance, Division of Reclamation-- 80 

Finance Act, Farm 113 

Finance and Accounts. Depart- 
ment of {Railroad Commis- 
sion) 119 

Financing and Refinancing Com- 
mission, California Irrigation 

and Reclamation SO 

Franchise Tax Act, Bank and 

Corporation 41 

Fr.\nciiise Tax Commissioner 41 

Franchise Tax Division (Con- 

iroller) 27 

Franchise Tax Division (Fran- 
chise Tax Commissioner) 41 

Free Employment Bi i:r\us. St.-ite 51 
Fuel Tax Division, Motor Vehicle .36 
Fuel Tax Refund Division. Motor 

Vehicle 24 



''^ Gas and Electric Division. 

1*^ I Gasoline Tax Department 

121 l(;iFT Tax Act 

l^-' UiOVF.RNOR 5. 

'*! Governor. Lieutenant 

I Governor's Council 

581 



121 

24 

24 

7 

7 

6 



47 

47 
50 

51 
51 



H 



Harhoh Bond Finance Board, San 

I Francisco 

i Harbor Commissioners for San 
I Francisco Harbor, Board of 

State 

Harbor Commissioners for the 

Bay of San Diego. Board of 

St.-ite 

Health. Safety and Insurance 

Depart.ment 

Highway Carriers' Act 

lIoiXERiTH Section 

Horse Racing Board. California 

HuMBoiDT Bay and Bar, Board of 

I'ilot (.'ommi.ssioners for 

Hydraulic Division 



52 
52 

70 

124 

81 
41 

[Income Tax Ait. Corporation 
12 Income Tax Division 



12ti 

o3 

129 

102 
122 



42 
42 



INDEX 



163 



Page 
Information, Department of (RaAl- 

road Commission) 123 

Inheritance Tax Division 24 

Insurance Department, Health, 

Safety and 71 

Intergovernmental Cooperation, 

California Commission on 155 

Investigating Section (Controller) 29 
Investigation, Division of {Rail- 
road Commission) 125 

Irrigation and Reclamation Fi- 
nancing and Refinancing 

Commission, California 89 

Irrigation Board, State 86 

Irrigation District Bond Com- 
mission 88 



Joint Federal-State Water Re- 
soubces Commission, Cali- 
fornia 8o 

Judges' Retirement Law 160 

(Judicial), Commission on Quali- 
fications 160 

Judicial Council 1"'9 

K 

Keeper of the Archives 12 



Labor and Employment Ex- 
change, California •>2 

Labor Camp Committee, State 67 

Land Commissioners, B o a r d of 

Swamp 77 

Law, Commissioners for the Revision 

and Reform of the 152 

Laws, Commission for the Revision 

of the 151 

Laws, Commission on Uniform State 154 

Legal Department __ 17 

Legal Department {Railroad Com- 
mission) 120 

Legislative Counsel 45. 149. 152 

Legisi ATivE Counsel Bureau 149 

Lieutenant Governor 7 

Liquor Control Act, State 35 

M 

Mailing and Distribution Di;part- 

ment {Secretary of Slate) 12 

Mare Island, Board of Pilot Com- 
missioners for the Port and 
Harbors of Benicia and WO 

Motor Transportation License 

Tax Division 27 

Motor Vehicle Department 13 

aioTOR Vehicle Fuel Tax Divi- 
sion 3() 



Page 
Motor Vehicle Fuel Tax Refund 

Division 24 

Motor Vehicle Transportation 

Tax Division 36 



Office 



Director of 
Admiiiistia- 



Management, 
(State Relief 
tion) 

Operations, Division of {State Re- 
lief Administration) 

Osteopathic Examiners, Board of 



GO 

66 

135 



Paymaster's Section 30 

Pensions of State Employees, 

Commission on 47 

Personnel, Division of (State Re- 
lief Administrnt ion) 63 

Personnel and Organization, Di- 
vision of ■ •' 

PER.''fiNNEL Bo>'fD. S^nto _.,.._ ^ — 4'. 48 

Personnel Wect.cn (Urparimeni -ji 

Employment) 54 

Pilot Commissioners for Hum- 
boldt Bay AND Bar. Board of 102 

Pilot Commissioners for the 
Bays of San Francisco. 
San Pablo, and Suisun, 
Board of 101 

Pilot Commissioners for the 
Port and Harbors, of Beni- 
cia AND ;Mare IsiaNd, Board 
of 

Pilot Commissioners for ^the 
Port of San Diego, Board "i 

Phot Commissioners for the 
Port of San Francisco. 
P.oard (vf 9il 

Pilots -'-' 

Planning and Re.'^earch, Division 
of (State Relief Adminisfra- 
tion) 64 

Port Opcration 96 

Port Wardens 1"! 

Port Wardens for the Port of 

San Francisco, Board of 104 

Poultry Imi'ROVement Commission 114 

Power Administration 120 

Production Department (State 

Relief Administration ) 72 

PUOFKSSIO.XAI . T v. ( II N ! C A I. AND 

W o M E N ■ .s W()i;k Depart- 
ment 71 

Prorate Advisory Commission, Ak- 

ri'ulturnl HI 

Public Relations Division (State 

Relief Adminislration I 60 

Pi i!MC Relations Section (De- 
partment 01 Employment) 51 



100 
102 



HA 



INDEX 



PaRo 

PrBLic L'tii.ities Act ll'J 

Public Utu-ities Department 12i) 

Publicity (Board of State Harbor 
ConiiiilsHioners for Son Fran- 
cisco Harbor) !l(i 

PuRCHASiNO Department (Stair 

Relief Admiiii.itration) 01 

Q 

(JuAi.iFiCATiONS (Judicial), Com- 
mission on KiO 

R 

Uacing Board, California Horse 120 

Railroad Commission 116 

Raii.ro.vd Co^rMIssIO^•ERs, Board of 118 
Railroad Operation and Mainte- 
nance 96 

Rate Ihvision 125 

Reapportionment Commission 7 

Reci^kmation Board 76 

Reclamation Finance, Division of 80 
Reclamation Financing and Re- 
financing Commission, Cali- 
fornia Irrigation and 80 

Reclamation Fund Commission- 
ers 78 

Redemption Tax Division 25 

Re-employment, Division of Work 

and 06 

Re:form of the Law, Commission- 
ers for the Revision and 152 

Refund Division. Motor Vehicle 

Fuel Tax 24 

Registry Department {Secretary 

of State) 13 

Rehabilitation Division, Rural 66 

Relief Administration. State 56 

Relief Administration, State 

Emergoncy 58 

Relief Administrator, State 58, 114 

Relief Bond Act, TTnpmi>lo.vinent 58 

Relief Division. Unemployment ' 

(Controllers 28 

Relief Finance Committee, Unem- 
ployment 58 

Reporting Department {Railroad 

Commission) 123 

Reports and Statistics Depart- 
ment (State Relief Adminii- 

tration) 01 

Research, Division of Planning and 

(State Relief Administration) 64 
Research and Statistics, Division 
of (State Board oi Equaliza- 
tion) 37 

Research and Statistics Section 

(Department of Employment) 54 

Research Bureau, Tax 38 

Reseiarch Division (Railroad Com- 
mission) 122 



Page 

Kr.siDENT PRO.IECT8. Bureau of 67 

Retail Sales Tax Division 39 

Retirement Law, Judges' 160 

Retirement System, State Employ- 
ees' 47 

Revenue and Taxation, Commis- 
sion on 37 

Revision and Reform of the IjAw, 

Commissioners fr)r the 152 

Revision of the Laws. Commission 

for the 151 

Rn'EB Control, Board of 79 

RuL£S AND Regulations Section 

{Department of Employment) 54 
RuBAL Rehabilitation Division— 66 

S 

Sacramento and San Joaquin 

Drainage District 80 

Sacramento Drainage District 79 

Sacramento River Drainage Dis- 
trict, Board of Commission- 
ers of the 78 

Safety and Insurance Depabt- 

ment, Health 71 

Safety Division {Railroad Commis- 
sion) 125 

Sales Tax Division 21! 

Saij:s Tax Division. Retail 39 

San Diego. Board of Pilot Commis- 

sionei-s for the Port of 102 

San Diego. Board of State Harbor 

Comniissionors for the Bay of 97 

San Francisco. Board of Pilot Com- 
missioners for the Port of-- 99 

San Francisco, Board of Port 

Wardens for the Port of 104 

.San Francisco Harbor, Board of 
State Ilarhor Comihissioners 
for 95 

San Francisco IIabbor Bond Fi- 
nance Board 96 

San Francisco, San Pablo, and 
SuisuN, Board of Pilot (Com- 
missioners for the Bays of 101 

San Joaquin Drainage Dlstrict, 

Sa< raini'iito and 80 

San Luis Rey Watehi Authority 91 

San Pablo, and Suisun, Board of 
Pilot Commissioners for the 
Bays of San Francisco 101 

SiXRurARY of State 8 

Securities Commission, California 

Districts 88 

Self-Heij", Bureau of 60 

Self-Help Cooperative Sebvice, 

Division of 69 

Service Department (Railroad 

Commission) 123 

Social and Administrative Audit, 

Bureau of 65 

Social Service, Bureau of 63 



INDEX 



165 



Page 

Social Smivice and County Ad- 
ministration, Division of 61 

Social Service Division 62 

Soil Conservation Committee, 

State 92 

Special Activities, Division of — 66 

Special Surveys and Studies, Di- 
vision of 65 

Stage and Truck Depaetment, 

Auto 126 

Stage Division, Truck and 126 

State, . See mime of agency 

(e.g. Relief Administration, 
State) 

Statistics, Division of Accounts 
and (Department of Employ- 
ment) 54 

Statistics, Division of Researcli 
and (State Board of Equali- 
zation) 37 

Statistics and Accounts, Depart- 
ment of (Railroad Commis- 
sion) 120 

Statistics Department (State Re- 
lief Administration) 61 

Statistics Department, Reports 
and (State Relief Administra^ 
tion) 

Statistics Section, Research and 
(Department of Employ- 
mcnt) 54 

Stock and Bond Department 

(Railroad Commission) 119 

SuisuN, Hoard of Pilot Commis- 
sioners for the Bays of San 
Francisco, San Pablo, and 

Surplus Commodity Division 

Surveys and Studies, Division of 

Special 

S vi' a M p Land Commissioners, 

Board of 77 



64 



101 
07 

65 



Tax 

Tax 
Tax 
Tax 

Tax 
Tax 
Tax 
Tax 
Tax 

Tax 
Tax 
Tax 
Tax 



Act, Bank and Corporation 

Franchise '11 

Act, Corporation Income 12 

Act. Gift 24 

Collection Department, Cor- 
poration 27 

Collection Division 26 

Commission, California 38 

Commission, Slate 38 

Commissioner, Franchise 41 

Dkpaktment, Corporation Li- 
cense 11 



Department, Delinquent 2o 

Department, Gasoline 24 

Division, Beverage 34 

DtvisiON, Franchise (Control- 
ler) 27 



Page 
Tax Division, Franchise (Franchise 

Tax Commissioner) 41 

Tax Division, Income 42 

Tax Division, Inlieritance 24 

Tax Division, Motor Transporta- 
tion License 27 

Tax Division, Motor Vehicle Fuel 36 
Tax Division, Motor Vehicle Trans- 
portation 36 

Tax Division, Redemption 25 

Tax Division, Retail Sales 39 

Tax Division, Sales 26 

T.vx Exemption Board, Corporation 

License 12 

Tax Refund Division, Motor Ve- 
hicle Fuel 24 

Tax Research Bureau 38 

Taxation, Commission on Revenue 

and 37 

Telephone and Telegraph Divi- 
sion 122 

Toll Bridge Authority, California 107 

Transient Division 68 

Transportation Commissionkrs, 

Board of 117 

Transportation Department 124 

Transportation License Tax Di- 
vision, Motor 27 

Transportation Tax Division, Mo- 
tor Vehicle 36 

Treasurer 21 

Truck and Stage Division 126 

Truck Department, Auto Stage and 126 

U 

Unemployment Commission, State r>7 
Unemployment Compensation, Di- 
vision of 53 

Unemployment Relief Bond Act_ 58 
Unemployment Relief Division 

(Controller) 28 

Unempioyment Relief Finance 

Committee 58 

Unemployment Reserves, Division 

of 53 

Unemploysient Reserves Commis- 
sion 51 

Uniform State Laws, Commission 

on 154 

University of California 139 

Utilities Act, Public 119 

Utilities Department, Public 120 

V 

Valuation Division (Railroad 

Commission) 122 

Valuation Division (State Hoard 

of Equalization) 40 

\'ault Department 21 



166 



INDEX 



rage 

Vehicie Ditartment. Motor 13 

Veiiici-e Fuel Tax Division, Motor 36 
Vehicle Fuel Tax Refund Divi- 
sion, Motor 24 

VEHICIJ; TliANSPORTATION TaX DI- 
VISION. Motor 30 

Voting Machines, State Commis- 
sion on 13 

W 

Wardens, Port 104 

Warrant Dicpartment {Treasurer) 21 

AV ARRANT Division (Controller) 30 

Warrant Registrau 30 

Waste Utilization Commission 114 

Water Authority, San Luis Key 91 



Page 



Water Conservation District 

Act, California 

Water 1'robij:ms Conference, State 

Water 1'ro.tect Authority 

Water Hksources Commission, 

California 

Watee Resources Commission, 
California Joint Federal-State 

WATB3t Storage District Act 

Welfare Division. Famil.v 

Women's Work Df.i-artment, Pro- 
fessional. Technical and 

I Work and Ricempixjyment, Division 

I of 

j Works Department 

' Works Progress Administration. 



87 
83 



84 

s;! 

86 
62 



70 
70 



rTtn? 1-4" 



X